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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, July, 1863. (search)
msport. It resulted in the success of the Confederates; but every impartial man confesses that these cavalry fights are miserable affairs. Neither party has any idea of serious charging with the sabre. They approach one another with considerable boldness, until they get to within about forty yards, and then, at the very moment when a dash is necessary, and the sword alone should be used, they hesitate, halt, and commence a desultory fire with carbines and revolvers. An Englishman, named Winthrop, a captain in the Confederate army, and formerly an officer in H. M.‘s 22d regiment, although not in the cavalry himself, seized the colors of one of the regiments, and rode straight at the Yankees in the most gallant manner, shouting to the men to follow him. He continued to distinguish himself by leading charges until his horse was unfortunately killed. I heard his conduct on this occasion highly spoken of by all. Stuart's cavalry can hardly be called cavalry in the European sense of th
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 34: Besieging Knoxville. (search)
. General Alexander was ordered to knock the rails about them and drive them out, and was partially successful, but the enemy got back before our infantry could reach them, so we had to carry the line by assault. Part of our line drove up in fine style, and was measurably successful, but other parts, smarting under the stiff musket fire, hesitated and lay down under such slight shelter as they could find, but close under fire,--so close that to remain inactive would endanger repulse. Captain Winthrop, of Alexander's staff, appreciating the crisis, dashed forward on his horse and led the halting lines successfully over the works. In his gallant ride he received a very severe hurt. Neither our numbers nor our condition were such as to warrant further aggressive action at the moment, nor, in fact, until the column from Virginia joined us. Our sharp-shooters were advanced from night to night and pitted before daylight, each line being held by new forces as the advance was made. The
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 35: cut off from East and West. (search)
el McElroy, of the Thirteenth Mississippi Regiment, and Colonel Thomas, of the Sixteenth Georgia, who also died in the ditch; Lieutenant Cumming, adjutant of the Sixteenth Georgia Regiment, who overcame all obstacles, crowned the parapet with ten or a dozen men, and, entering the fort through one of the embrasures, was taken prisoner; and Colonel Fiser, of the Eighteenth Mississippi, who lost an arm while on the parapet. Not the least of the gallant acts of the campaign was the dash of Captain Winthrop, who led our once halting lines over the rail defences at Knoxville. The transfer of the army to the east bank of the river was executed by diligent work and the use of such flat-boats and other means of crossing as we could collect and construct. We were over by the 20th, and before Christmas were in our camps along the railroad, near Morristown. Blankets and clothes were very scarce, shoes more so, but all knew how to enjoy the beautiful country in which we found ourselves. The
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 28 (search)
Get right along, now. Oh, drop your guns; you'll never need them any more. You'll all be safe over there. Are there any more of you? We want every one of you fellows. Nearly 1500 were captured at the angle. An orderly here came up to Sheridan, saluted, and said: Colonel Forsyth of your staff is killed, sir. It's no such thing! cried Sheridan. I don't believe a word of it. You'll find Forsyth's all right. Ten minutes later Forsyth rode up. He had been mistaken for the gallant General Winthrop, who had fallen in the assault. Sheridan did not even seem surprised when he saw Forsyth, and merely said: There; I told you so. This incident is mentioned as illustrative of a peculiar trait of Sheridan's character, which never allowed him to be disturbed by camp rumors, however disastrous. The dismounted cavalry had assaulted as soon as they heard the infantry fire open. The natty cavalrymen, with their tight-fitting jackets, and short carbines, swarmed through the pine thicket
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture VII: the institution of domestic slavery. (search)
ered as permanently established, makes a period of some hundred and fifty years. Among the eminent personages who appeared in Great Britain during this period, and did not fail to impress their genius and moral character upon the age in which they lived, we may mention, James I., Cromwell, and William III., Burnet, Tillotson, Barrow, South, with Bunyan and Milton; and also Newton and Locke. In the colonies, during this time, there lived Cotton Mather, Brainerd, Eliot, and Roger Williams; Winthrop, Sir it. Vane, and Samuel Adams, with Henry, Washington, and Franklin. These great men, and some of them eminently good men, stood connected with a numerous class of highly influential men, though inferior in position, and all together may be regarded as embodying and controlling public opinion in their day. Some of them were preeminently distinguished for their patriotic devotion to the rights of humanity. Many others were men of wide views on all subjects, and of broad and expansive f
Cuba to be sold, and that they declare their intention to make the sale of negroes one means of defraying the expenses of the war. The authorities of the South can only meet this procedure in one way. For every negro kidnapped, some Yankee prisoner must be put into the hands of the master who has been robbed, to supply the place of his servant, till the negro is returned, and for every slave sold to Cuba, or elsewhere, two Yankees must be enslaved. The time for forbearance with these wretches has passed, and the people of the South demand that they shall be treated as their crimes deserve. A gentleman informs us, as from a perfectly reliable source, that a letter was found on the person of Capt. Winthrop, who was slain in the late battle of Bethel Church, or County Bridge, directed to his sister, in which he said that he had not made much headway as yet; that he had captured twenty negroes, and when he had made sale of them he would send her a nice present.--Richmond Dispatch.
Jan. 27.--Mr. Winthrop, one of the Boston Union Committee, called on Senator Mason, and, referring to his former visit to Massachusetts, remarked in the blandest tones, I hope, Mr. Mason, we shall see you again at Bunker Hill. To which the Senator stiffly jerked out the response--Not unless I come as an ambassador, sir. --Times.
with General Humphreys, if Griffin's division had to be moved up to the point where Generals Ayres and Crawford were. The action of the enemy, however interfered with the plans, as they often did, and produced the resulting operations. General Winthrop, with his brigade of General Ayres' division, advanced accordingly about 10 1/2 A. M., and was repulsed, and simultaneously an attack, which had been preparing against General Ayres, was made by the enemy in heavy force, both from the north lders. General Ayres placed the Maryland brigade on his left, in two lines, and General Gwin's brigade on his right; this last brigade was formed in three lines instead of two, as the regiments could not be so well disposed in two lines. General Winthrop's brigade, General Ayres formed as his reserve. General Crawford formed his lines so as to place Colonel Kellogg's brigade on his left, General Baxter's brigade on his right, and General Coulter's brigade as his reserve. The length of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg. (search)
agment of the Fifth North Carolina Cavalry, that officer exhibiting under my eye individual prowess deserving special commendation. The repulse was soon after converted into a rout by Colonel Lomax's regiment (Eleventh Virginia Cavalry, Jones' brigade), which now took the road, and, under the gallant leadership of its colonel, with drawn sabres charged down the turnpike under a fearful fire of artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel Funsten behaved with conspicuous gallantry in this charge, and Captain Winthrop, a volunteer aid of Lieutenant-General Longstreet's, also bore himself most gallantly. The enemy was now very near Williamsport, and this determined and vigorous attack in rear soon compelled him to raise the siege of that place, and leave in hasty discomfiture by the Downsville road. His withdrawal was favored by night, which set in just as we reached the ridge overlooking Williamsport. An important auxilliary to this attack was rendered by Brigadier-General Fitz. Lee, who reached
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
gment of the Fifth North Carolina cavalry--that officer exhibiting, under my eye, individual prowess deserving special commendation. The repulse was soon after converted into a rout by Colonel Lomax's regiment, Eleventh Virginia cavalry, Jones' brigade, which now took the road, and under the gallant leadership of its Colonel, with drawn sabres, charged down the turnpike under a fearful fire of artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel Funsten behaved with conspicuous gallantry in this charge, and Captain Winthrop, a volunteer aid of Lieutenant-General Longstreet, also bore himself most gallantly. The enemy was now very near Williamsport, and this determined and vigorous attack in rear soon compelled him to raise the seige of that place and leave in hasty discomfiture by the Downsville road. His withdrawal was favored by night, which set in just as we reached the ridge overlooking Williamsport. An important auxiliary to this attack was rendered by Brigadier-General Lee, who reached the vic
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