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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Introduction (search)
harangues; and the event threatened to be un diner manque. The chairman next called on Lyman, who regretted that the previous proceedings had been tinged with a levity unworthy of so serious an occasion, proposed to do something solemn, sang a comic song, and saved the day. The Lyman family of New England is of old English stock. Its founder, one Richard Lyman, came to America in 1681, on the good ship Lyon, which among its sixty odd passengers included John Eliot, and the wife of Governor Winthrop and her children. The first Theodore Lyman, a direct descendant of Richard in the fifth generation, was the son of the pastor of Old York in the District of Maine. Maine was then a part of Massachusetts. Toward the end of the eighteenth century Theodore left York, and came to Massachusetts Bay, where he settled in Boston. There he became a successful man of business, and laid the foundation of the family fortunes. The second Theodore (1792-1849) was born in Boston, and graduate
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
Wright, though always pleasant, is, I think rather in low spirits. He has had poor luck, on numerous occasions, and it culminated at Cedar Creek, where he chanced to have command of the army when it was surprised. He had rallied it, when Sheridan arrived on the field; but of course Sheridan had the credit of the victory, and indeed he deserved it. All the officers say that Wright made prodigious exertions and rode along all parts of the line in the hottest fire. December 14, 1864 General Winthrop [in speaking of Warren's operations] said his brigade bivouacked in a cornfield; it blew, snowed and sleeted all night, and when reveille beat in the morning, you could only see what seemed a field full of dead bodies, each covered with a rubber blanket and encased with ice. Some of the men had to kick and struggle, they were so hard frozen down.. Yet, despite this, I have not learned that it has caused much sickness. How would you like to carry forty or fifty pounds all day, be wet th
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
ot, Jr., 128, 211. Weldon railroad, 217, 224, 226, 23, 294. Wheaton, Frank, 91, 299; before Petersburg, 175, 177. White, Julius, 219. Wilcox's wharf, 163. Wilderness, the, 53, 89; battle of, 98. Wilkinson, Morton Smith, 75. Willcox, Orlando Bolivar, 212, 234, 310. Williams, Seth, 23, 60, 110, 123, 171, 221, 258, 270; on Sunday work, 28; brevet denied, 289; messenger to Lee, 354. Williams house, 173, 189. Wilson, James Harrison, 82, 104, 136, 156. Wingate, —, 357. Winthrop, Frederick, 800. Wise, Henry Alexander, 162, 361. Women in camp, 64, 65, 74, 75, 314, 317, 318; dinner party, 71; ultra-secessionist, 119; poor, 129. Woodruff, George, 315. Woodruff, Henry Dwight, 287. Woody's house, 140. Woolsey, Charles W., 253, 294. Wooten, Thomas J., 152, 187. Worth, William Scott, 64, 210, 318. Wounded, spirit of the, 71, 128. Wright, Horatio Gouverneur, 88, 90, 98, 108, 110, 111, 112, 114, 128, 135, 137, 138, 140, 143, 145, 148, 179, 190, 314, 350, 352; on Mo