Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Robert C. Winthrop or search for Robert C. Winthrop in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
lic feeling against Great Britain, and raised vexed questions concerning the inviolability of national territory, and the jurisdiction of courts over acts assumed by a foreign government. The restriction or prohibition of the sale of ardent spirits —a controversy which forty years of agitation have not settled —was for the first time disturbing politicians. Richard Fletcher was re-elected to Congress as the member for Boston. George Bancroft was appointed Collector of the Port, and Robert C. Winthrop chosen Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch, author of The Practical Navigator and translator of the Mecanique Celeste, ended a career dedicated to science. George Combe, of Edinburgh, was delivering lectures on phrenology in Boston. Horace Mann was urging with prodigious earnestness and industry the cause of education. Daniel Webster was about to sail for Europe on his only foreign journey. The Sirius and Great Western were traversing the A
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
Besides my immediate circle of friends, whom you know,—Hillard, Longfellow, Cleveland, Felton,—I see a good deal of the Ticknors, who receive every evening at their well-appointed house; of the Otises (old Harrison G. I like much); of the Prescotts,—William H., the author of the history of Fer-dinand and Isabella, is very much my friend: he is a capital fellow Of course, I see Judge Story constantly, and love him as much as ever . . . Pardon all these blots; they are my escutcheon. Robert C. Winthrop is elected to Congress. Judge Story has recently published second editions of his Bailments, Equity Jurisprudence, and Equity Pleading, and is now engaged on a second edition of the Conflict of Laws, much enlarged. He has also published a work on Agency since you left the country. All these are republished in England. Greenleaf is engaged upon a work on Evidence. Prescott, you know, is writing the Conquest of Mexico. It will be in three volumes, but will not be finished for sever<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
use you did not know—his worth. He was the first suggester of that system of education of the blind which my friend Dr. Howe has administered with such success. . . . Webster's place in the Cabinet must be as uncomfortable as possible. I hope that he may succeed in the negotiations, so as to give him an opportunity of resigning. Tyler shows himself each day weaker, more selfish, more ambitious, more paltry. Contempt is all that he deserves. Mr. Appleton Nathan Appleton, successor of Mr. Winthrop in Congress. has made a sensible, practical speech—not too long—in Congress. He is alone in the heats of the Capital. Prescott is now at Nahant,—the promontory jutting far into the saltwater, fourteen miles from Boston. He hopes you will not be swallowed up by a buffalo, before you return to Oriental civilization. To Dr. Francis Lieber. Boston, July 13, 1842. Your note, dear Lieber, came yesterday. . . . Do you abjure Boston, this summer? Bring Mrs. Lieber to the North, and gi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
, he is justified in the extreme course he took. Remembrance to your wife, whose delightful letter I do not forget. Ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Robert C. Winthrop, M. C., Washington, D. C. Boston, Feb. 9, 1843. my dear Sir,—Your favor of Feb. 1 and the accompanying documents reached me late this afternoon. I had already read in the Courier your admirable report, Mr. Winthrop's report on the imprisonment of colored seamen, made in the House of Representatives of the United States, Jan. 20, 1843. Winthrop's Addresses and Speeches, Vol. I. pp. 340-352. which seems to me to put the argument of the Northern States with unanswerable force Winthrop's Addresses and Speeches, Vol. I. pp. 340-352. which seems to me to put the argument of the Northern States with unanswerable force and distinctness. You will allow me to say, that I have not read any document from Congress for a long time which gratified me so much by its tone, its composition, and its matter. The views you maintain are presented with that blended firmness and decorum, which take from the South all cause of offence at the same time that yo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
of Webster and Choate. Sometimes a veteran orator has been summoned from his retirement, as Mr. Everett in 1860, and Mr. Winthrop in 1876,—each speaking with undiminished vigor, and adding another to his many triumphs. But generally, from the earlse of Scriptural texts, by another hand. The appendix of the city edition contained a letter of his, dated July 6, to Mr. Winthrop (the name of the person to whom it was addressed being left blank), which related to the Revolutionary War, and to Dr.and probably his dissent seemed at the time more marked than it now appears in the brief record of the daily journals. Mr. Winthrop, then member of Congress, sitting by Sumner's side, followed. While making no issue with the oration, the general diweakened on the class then controlling society and opinion in Boston,—the class always faithful to Webster, Everett, and Winthrop. His personal qualities still insured him a kindly reception as a guest, but his fidelity to the interests then uppermo