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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The South's Museum. (search)
am received from Miss May Singleton Hampton of congratulation on the auspicious day: Greeting to Confederate Memorial Literary Society; regret I am not with you. In this connection it may be stated that a telegram was also received from Mrs. Barton Haxall Wise, now in attendance upon the Congress of Daughters of the American Revolution in Washington. This stated that her motion to make an appropriation to the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities was greeted with acclamatiogia room. Mrs. Robert Emory Park, Macon, Ga., Regent; Mrs. J. Prosser Harrison, Richmond, Va., Vice-Regent; Miss Lucy Lily Temple, alternate. The following ladies, native Georgians, were in charge, with the Vice-Regent as chairman: Mrs. Barton Haxall Wise, Mrs. Thomas E. Binford, Mrs. Luther Warren, Mrs. Peyton Wise, Mrs. Ashton Starke, Mrs. Charles Ellis, and with the committee the following young ladies: Misses Tatum, Peebles, Causey, of Delaware, Mary De Noble, Morgan, of California, J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
r Courthouse. The address has been furnished by Mr. Barton Haxall Wise, a young lawyer of Richmond, Va., who has in prepaavailable forces on both sides the Appomattox, Martin's and Wise's Brigade, numbering in all about 5,000 men, to cross the Auregard, changing this, came, ordering (J. G.) Martin's and Wise's Brigades to be at Dunlop's, on the Richmond and Petersburad and the turnpike. Martin's Brigade was on the right and Wise's on the left, crossing the turnpike on which the enemy hadf Cobb's on the Appomattox. The part borne by Martin's and Wise's Brigades upon the enemy in their front was without failur was supported in a third line by the remaining portions of Wise's Brigade. The 600 carried the front before either brigadeline. After this line was captured and settled firmly, General Wise was sent with but one of his regiments, the 46th, and aver. Colonel Page was there in command of our brigade, General Wise being in command of the District. The latter however w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
rough two gate posts (I presume along a private road). As we wound down the hill, we saw on our left a house flying the yellow flag. We crossed the creek on a few fence rails thrown in. The creek was shallow, but marshy. As we went up the hill, the road bearing to the left, we came to several pieces of artillery and caissons which had been abandoned, and near them I found a soldier of this county —R. D. Burruss, by name—badly wounded, who belonged to the 46th Regiment, Virginia Volunteers, Wise's Brigade (this regiment I had commanded for about two years). He informed me that nearly all the brigade had been killed, wounded, or captured, around Petersburg, or on the retreat. Group of officers. After going a short distance further, I came to a group of mounted officers, consisting of Generals Ewell, Custis Lee, Barton and others. In a few moments the artillery of the enemy opened on us. For myself, I must confess I felt somewhat excited, but General Ewell remarked in his ordina
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
nown in Southern history as the battle of Boonsborough, the 23rd Regiment bore a prominent part, and it was in this fight that General Garland, the brigade commander, was killed. It is well to recur to the report of this battle, as furnished by General D. H. Hill to the Century Magazine of May, 1886, for facts and observations, we quote: In the retirement of Lee's army from Frederick to Hagerstown and Boonsborough, my division constituted the rear-guard. It consisted of five brigades (Wise's brigade being left behind), and after the arrival at Boonsborough, was intrusted with guarding the wagon-trains and packs of artillery belonging to the whole army. It was to save Lee's trains and artillery that the battle was fought, and not to prevent the advance of McClellan, as was believed in the North from an exaggerated idea about the number of Confederates engaged. General Hill says: My division was very small and was embarrassed with the wagon-trains and artillery of the who
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Drewry's Bluff. (search)
tter from General Beauregard to General Wise Regarding the battle, and the difference between General Beauregard and General Bragg as to the war policy at that crisis. Now printed, as written, from the original, now owned by the grandson of General Wise, Mr. Barton Haxall Wise, of Richmond, Virginia: Alleghany Springs, October 3, 1873. My dear General. Mr. Marrin has referred to me your letter of the 19th ulto. I give you, with pleasure, some of the dates you refer to. I arrived at Mr. Barton Haxall Wise, of Richmond, Virginia: Alleghany Springs, October 3, 1873. My dear General. Mr. Marrin has referred to me your letter of the 19th ulto. I give you, with pleasure, some of the dates you refer to. I arrived at Petersburg from Weldon (where I had been ordered to from Charleston to await orders) on or about the 14th May, ‘64. Finding that General Pickett was very ill from fever, I ordered Genl. Whiting, then at Wilmington, to come at once to Petersburg to assume command, while I moved to Drury's Bluff, where General Hoke temporarily commanded. General W. arrived at about noon on the 13th, & after about one hour's conference with him & leaving with him some written general instructions, I started for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
he banks of the Appomattox, to the Colquitt salient, the Confederate lines were there held by General Wise's Virginia brigade and the Virginia reserves. The Federals came across the James river and advanced on Petersburg by the Charles City roads. They swept across Wise's lines, leaving no Confederate position occupied except that of the Virginia battery at the Appomattox. From that point to Coe and up the Main street we marched, my blackness illuming and leading the way. It was just after Wise's brigade had given way. They were running back, some hatless, some shoeless, and nearly all withhe picket line in the gray of the morning, there could be seen Federal pickets approaching two of Wise's abandoned forts in our front, as if to take possession of them. The forts were as near to us a About this time some of Captain Dave Walton's company came in from the front, and said one of Wise's abandoned cannon and limber chest were at the foot of the hill in front, about sixty yards away
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
ls at ten paces, said Fry, and as he said, the second of the Captain came forward and demanded another shot. We agree, said Jackson, and we will fight with pistols at ten paces. The Captain declined the terms, the men were never reconciled. The Captain died many years after, regretting that he had not killed Lee. Jackson was a strict constructionist of all orders and of all points of duty. Obeyed the order. When John Brown made his attempt to arouse insurrection in Virginia, Governor Wise called out the troops, of the State, and ordered the Corps of Cadets to be held ready for immediate service. General Smith, superintendent of the corps, promptly obeyed the orders. Major Jackson reported at the guard-room ready for the field. General Smith, after giving attention to some matters requiring it, said: Major Jackson, you will remain as you are till further orders. At that moment Major Jackson was seated upon a campstool in the guard-room with his sabre across his knees.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
White Horse, Incident of the officer on the, 105. Whiting, Gen. W. H. C., 10, 215. Wiatt, Chaplain W. E., 16. Wilcox, Ella Wheeler, 231. Wilderness, Battle of the, 259, 339. Wilson, Lt., Samuel, 139. Winchester, Battle of, 97. Wise, Barton Haxall, 1, 205. Wise's Brigade, Career of, 1. Wise, Capt., Geo. D., killed, 14. Wise, Gen. Henry A,, 86, ,206. Wise. Gen. Peyton, Native of, 14. Wright, Gen. G. J ,147. Wright, Gen. H. G., 287. Yorktown, Defense of, 155. Youngen. W. H. C., 10, 215. Wiatt, Chaplain W. E., 16. Wilcox, Ella Wheeler, 231. Wilderness, Battle of the, 259, 339. Wilson, Lt., Samuel, 139. Winchester, Battle of, 97. Wise, Barton Haxall, 1, 205. Wise's Brigade, Career of, 1. Wise, Capt., Geo. D., killed, 14. Wise, Gen. Henry A,, 86, ,206. Wise. Gen. Peyton, Native of, 14. Wright, Gen. G. J ,147. Wright, Gen. H. G., 287. Yorktown, Defense of, 155. Young, Gen. P. M. B., Tribute to, 146; his defense of Savannah, 150.