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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 2 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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ny that tested me that hour. With eager eyes around me, who vainly hoped to see Some portion of that feeling they deemed I had for thee, With none to whisper one kind word, encouraging my heart, And waken more of scorn and pride than manner dared impart. Alone I met thy downcast eye; ah! well thou didst not raise Thy guilty eye to meet the haughty welcome of my gaze; 'Twas coward-like to seek me beneath my sacred roof When all things slumber — e'en the eye that might have flashed reproof. Wise as thou wert, in knowledge of hypocrisy and guile, Sorrow taught my woman's heart — I met thee with a smile; But when thy hand sought mine with a friendly grasp and bold, I felt the life-blood at my heart was turning sick and cold. Yet watchful eyes were round us, they saw thy proffered hand, And heard thy words of greeting — open, courteous, bland; I met thy clasp as calmly as the rock the wavelet's spray, Then to more welcome guests as calmly turned away. S. A. D. -Southern Literary Mess<
King Cotton. When, tempted by Satan, Jeff Davis would try To imitate Louis Napoleon, When oaths and allegiance like chaff he made fly, And trampled whatever was holy on; To give him a character in the world's eyes, And bolster his plans misbegotten, He called on the strongest of all his allies, (A better than Memminger, Stephens, or Wise,) His pal and his comrade King Cotton, King Cotton, His pal and his comrade King Cotton. “Hurra, mighty Cotton! our scheme is a-foot, So get up your prettiest figure; For travelling dress take your best royal suit, (Dyed gules with the blood of a nigger;) Go round to the nations and ask for their aid, And teach them much more than they wot on; Go, make all your brothers, the monarchs, afraid Their kingdoms must perish if ‘reft of our trade.” “By Plutus, I will,” says King Cotton, King Cotton, “By Plutus, I will,” says King Cotton. Then off goes King Cotton to find Johnny Bull, And deep in his counting-house found him; (Of idols and opium t
ntral Mo., Jefferson city, August 9, 1863. General orders No. 42. On the night of the sixth inst. a party of bushwhackers, some three in number, visited the house of a Mr. Schwartz, about twelve miles from Jefferson City, in Cole County, and on demanding admittance they were refused by Miss Schwartz, a young lady of fifteen. They replied they would come in, at the same time trying to break down the door. While this was going on, the other inmates of the house, namely, Mr. Schwartz, John Wise, Captain Golden, Government horse-dealer, and a young man.in his employ, all left, taking with them (as they supposed) all the arms and ammunition. In their hasty retreat they left behind a revolver, which Miss Schwartz appropriated to her own use. She went to the door, and on opening it presented the pistol to the leader of the gang, telling them to Come on, if they wanted to, and that some of them should fall, or she would. They threatened to kill her if she did not leave the door. Sh
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
ting-Assistant Surgeon, L. M. Reese; Assistant Paymaster, Geo. A. Lyon; Acting-Master, James Fitzpatrick; Acting-Ensigns, Sylvester Pool and James Marshall; Acting-Master's Mates, J. G. Magler, W. E. Anderson, F. O. Blake and S. S. Willett; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Wm. H. Meredith; Acting-Assistants, Michael Kelly, J. H. Hilliard, Wm. Bishop and Job Cummins. Iron-clad steamer Baron deKalb. Lieutenant-Commander, John G. Walker; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, J. V. Johnston; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, John Wise; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Wm. A. Mann; Acting-Masters, Chas. Kendrick and R. H. Medill; Acting-Ensign, Charles Hunter; Acting-Masters' Mates, H. H. Gorringe, E. D. Breed, F. E. Davis and J. M. Meacham; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Thomas Hebron; Acting-Assistants, J. L. Smith, J. S. Wilcoxen and Geo. Britton. Steamer Conestoga. Lieutenant-Commander, Thomas O. Selfridge; Assistant-Surgeon, J. Otis Burt; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. D. Ellsley; Acting-Master, George Henti
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
unteer-Lieutenant, E, M. King; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, R. W. Gifford; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. B. Crosby, Jr.; Acting-Master, M. J. Cronin; Acting-Ensigns, John H. Welsh and N. A. Closson: Acting-Master's Mates, Wm. Hammett, Jr., Menzies Dickson and John Winram; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, R. J. Stone; Acting-Second-Assistants, G. W. Dean and G. L. Mortimer; Acting-Third-Assistant, Michael Sodon. Steamer Peosta. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Thos. E. Smith; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, John Wise; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. C. Spalding; Acting-Ensigns, Edw. Manser, C. H. Gulick and A. S. Hurlbut; Acting-Master's Mates, R. T. Nelson and Geo. P. Vance; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, Geo. H. Warner; Acting-Second-Assistant, S. W. Evans; Acting-Third-Assistants, D. E. Nugent and G. W. Makefield; Gunner, J. A. McDonald; Acting-Carpenter, Wm. B. Reid. Steamer Reindeer. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Henry A. Glassford; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, W. C. Foster; Acti
on Arkansas Post, January eleventh, 1863: John Ryan, landsman, killed; Theo. Bender, third-class boy, severely wounded, probably mortal; Peter Olton, coxswain; Geo. Smith, seaman, severely; Jos. Bader, seaman; Jno. Farren, seaman; William Smith, seaman; M. C. Doreohs, slightly wounded; Wm. Swisler, seaman; Joseph H. Malon, seaman; Alfred H. Boyle, yeoman; Oscar Jordan, seaman; Antonio de Uroa, seaman; Geo. Fales, seaman; William Kelley, seaman; Pierre Leon, seaman; John Glenn, seaman. John wise, Acting Assistant Surgeon. To Jno. G. Walker, Lieutenant Commanding. Report of Lieutenant Commanding Bache. United States Mississippi Squadron, United States gunboat Cincinnati, off Arkansas Post, January 12, 1863. sir: I have the honor to report having sustained no serious damage in the attack on the tenth. One shell struck us at the water-line forward, and a second went through the upper works. We were equally fortunate during the attack of yesterday, although struck nine ti
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wise, John 1808- (search)
Wise, John 1808- Balloonist; born in Lancaster, Pa., Feb. 24, 1808; made his first ascension at Philadelphia, Pa., May 2, 1835, and ascended to an altitude of 13,000 feet, Aug. 11, 1838. On Aug. 15, 1851, he made an ascent from Zanesville, O., to experiment on the action of falling bodies, and discovered that they always fall spirally, turning on an axis as they descend. In 1859 he made a celebrated trip from St. Louis to Jefferson county, N. Y. On Sept. 28, 1879, with a number of companin axis as they descend. In 1859 he made a celebrated trip from St. Louis to Jefferson county, N. Y. On Sept. 28, 1879, with a number of companions, he ascended from St. Louis, Mo., in a balloon named the Pathfinder, which drifted in a northeasterly direction. The last that was ever seen of it was as it passed over Carlinville, Ill. Later the body of one of his companions was washed ashore on Lake Michigan. In all, Mr. Wise made over 230 ascensions. He was the author of System of aeronautics.
, 413-415, 420, 422. Williams, W. G., I, 111, 112, 115, 117, 123, 135, 144, 209. Williamsport, Md., July, 1863, II, 134,140, 201, 363, 364, 366, 372. Willings, I, 9. Wilmer, Mr., II, 151. Wilson, Senator, I, 379; II, 161, 165, 256, 257, 343, 344. Winegar, C. E., II, 99. Winslow, G. B., II, 79. Winsor, Harry, I, 384. Wise, Mrs. Henry A., I, 199. Wise, Mrs., II, 278. Wise, Geo. D., II, 206. Wise, Henry A., I, 17, 96, 139, 140, 245; II, 205, 238, 259, 270. Wise, John, II, 261. Wise, Nene, II, 277. Wise, Oby, I, 246. Wise, Peyton, II, 206, 238. Wise, Mrs., Tully, II, 278. Wises, II, 151, 278. Wistar, Isaac J., I, 226. Wister, Capt., II, 232. Wister, Francis, I, 254. Wister, Langhorne, II, 53. Wofford, W. T., II, 80, 86. Wood, Thos. J., I, 25, 29, 32, 33, 49, 51, 111. Woodruff, Isaac C., I, 228, 346, 355. Wool, John E., I, 111, 112, 148, 152, 153, 168, 170, 173, 249. Worsam, Henrietta Constantia, I, 2. Worsam,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: the Puritan divines, 1620-1720 (search)
e theocratic group — the Mathers; the democrats-john Wise. learning of the Puritan divines. their industry. the United States, pp. 201-213. Seven years later John Wise, pastor of the second church of Ipswich, publishedsachusetts. Posterity has been too negligent of John Wise hitherto. Although possessed of the keenest mind ependence and democratic self-respect, which stood John Wise in good stead when he later came to speak for the it in providing a system for his chosen people? But Wise had broken with the literal Hebraism of earlier timetic movement of modern times, the life and work of John Wise take on new interest. After a spirited contest lad towards Congregationalism. The son of a plebeian, Wise came naturally into sympathy with the spirit of radifying his ecclesiasticism by political principles, John Wise was an early witness to the new order of thought. send his manuscript to London for publication, and John Wise probably sent his manuscript of The churches quarr
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
-he lessened his opportunities to develop his literary talent, and at the same time increased his desire to exalt the glory of American letters. Unusually sensitive to the faults of his fellow-countrymen, he too often went out of his way to rail at primogeniture, lotteries, French fashions, paper money, and the charities of those venerable married ladies, and thrice venerable spinsters, who go about our cities like roaring lions, doing good. When in such works as in Merry tales of the three Wise men of Gotham (1826), and the New Mirror for travellers (1828), he undertook to quiz political or fashionable failings, his irony was not infrequently more severe than just. The same objection may be applied with double force to the acrimonious squibs which he hurled at British critics who dared sneer at American innovations. See also Book II, Chap. I. Like many of his contemporaries Paulding could not refrain from using his stylus as a dagger whenever patriotically aroused, and he lost
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