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The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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L. I. Blues. --This glorious old company' commanded by Capt. O. J. Wise, has enlisted a large number of men, who are now under constant drill, and anxiously awaiting a call to perilous duty. Mr. Wm. L. Maule was elected senior 2d Lieutenant of the corps last Friday night. The Blues, who are the oldest company in the State, and can boast of historic renown, are not willing to live on the glories of the past. Their motto has ever been "upward and onward." Under the leadership of so chivalrous a gentleman as Jennings Wise has ever proved himself to be, they have become as an unit, and so act, and so will continue to act, whether as peaceful volunteers "placing soldier" or amid the din of the battle field and wars alarums. The Blues can be counted on as surely as the sun rises and sets. There is not a man, woman or child in Richmond that could not entrust his or her honor to their keeping, assured that it could be preserved to the death.
The Richmond Light Infantry Blues, O. J. Wise commanding, who are now at Camp Mercer, near Fredericksburg, Va., celebrated their 68th anniversary on Friday, the 10th of May, at Poplar Spring, a pleasant suburban retreat near their quarters. Nothing short of actual battle will ever prevent the "Old Blues" from paying suitable honor to the 10th of May.
The Wise brigade. We understand that some of the finest companies of the Virginia forces have been transferred to the Wise Brigade. The recruiting officers have the promise of ten thousand men. The Wise brigade. We understand that some of the finest companies of the Virginia forces have been transferred to the Wise Brigade. The recruiting officers have the promise of ten thousand men.
Returned home. --The R. L. I. Blues, who have been on duty for several weeks past in the vicinity of Aquia Creek and the enemy's cruisers, having been ordered back to this post, returned by the Fredericksburg route yesterday, under the gallant Capt., O. J. Wise. The Blues looked "none the worse for wear" on account of their exposure on the tented field. We believe they were marched away at such short notice that they never yet have been mustered regularly into service. If so, that formality will now be complied with.
From Gen. Wise's Legion We publish this morning an interesting letter from Charleston relative to the condition of things in the Kanawha Valley and Gen. Wise's proceedings. He is bent on reforming the Tories or punishing them as they deserve. He says no snakes shall lurk in the grass of the soil he is sent to defend. It is evident that the West and Northwest has been neglected too long. The Northwest might have been in a very different condition had some more prompt measures been takeGen. Wise's proceedings. He is bent on reforming the Tories or punishing them as they deserve. He says no snakes shall lurk in the grass of the soil he is sent to defend. It is evident that the West and Northwest has been neglected too long. The Northwest might have been in a very different condition had some more prompt measures been taken to check the traitors, Carlice & Co., and to arm the State Rights men. There would have been no burning and mading of the properly of true men now going on there.
espondence of the Richmond Dispatch. From the Kanawha Valley--Gen. Wise After the Tories — He Talks to a Preacher and Converts Him — He Worough military order, as I am informed by those who accompanied General Wise in a visit on Friday last. The state of public sentiment inll reclaim the most of it, and ultimately repossess it all. General Wise is pursuing no equivocal policy towards traitors. He has proclagh misled and woefully ignorant, was arrested by Captain Caskie. General Wise examined him, with a view to release or to hand him over to the oyalty in future to Virginia and the Confederate States, he shook Gen. Wise warmly by the hand, and left for his home in Clay. Since then weite Sulphur Rifles, from Monroe county. The Blues, under Captain O. J. Wise, are great favorites everywhere, and whenever they march throce writing the above, three more traitors have been brought in to Gen. Wise.--They are from Roane county, and one (Col. S. Ar Roberts) was a
jail of this city; for there are parties now there who have said less than Phelps, Valiandigham and Burnett will say on the floor of the United States Congress. The Administration expect two grand battles to-day or to-morrow. One between Gen. Wise's and Gen. McClelland's armies at Huttonsville, forty miles from Phillippi; and the other between the forces of Generals Patterson and Johnston, near Martinsburg. Baltimore Exchange The forces under the respective commanders is believed to be about as follows: McClelland20,020 Wise11,000 Patterson23,000 Johnston16,000 The usurped, or Western Virginia Government, were about to disorganize to-day for want of means. But I believe they have managed to steal a considerable sum from the State proper, which, together with an enormous tax on the Yankee squatters in the Panhandle, will keep them going for a few weeks. Governor (?) Pierpont has taken $27,000 which was deposited by the State in the Exchange Bank of
ict. All they require is an opportunity to show Lincoln's hirelings how skillfully they can use their favorite and trusty rifles. Two very substantially equipped companies, the "Invincible" from Pittsylvania, and the "Guards" from Appomattox, numbering in all about two hundred men, under command of Capts. Watson and Talbot, arrived here on the morning of the 4th and pitched their tents for the night. They took up a line of march the following morning for Lewisburg, on their way to join Wise's Legion. The University Volunteers, Captain Crane, with fifty-five men, passed here yesterday for the same destination. They are all fine-looking, intelligent gentlemen, and they are well prepared to undergo the duties incident to camp life, and their friends at home will no doubt hear a good account of them should a favorable opportunity ever present itself. I arrived at this delightful and picturesque summer resort a few days ago, where I found every preparation being made by the at
From Kanawha. --The editor of the Lewisburg Chronicle publishes some facts from a letter dated Charleston, Kanawha county, June 30: Gen. Wise was then in Charleston, and Capt. O. J. Wise's company, the Richmond Blues, left Charleston about 10 o'clock at night, June 29th, for Gilmer county, in consequence of having learned that about 100 of the enemy had crossed over and were committing depredations. Capt. Brock's Rockingham Cavalry and Capt. Beirne's Monroe Rifles had also left, but were expected to return in a few days. One of the Monroe Company died on the 29th from measles; he exposed himself imprudently during his sickness. A company of Riflemen arrived on the 30th from Roane county, with three prisoners; one of them a delegate to the Wheeling Convention, and the others had violated the persons of two ladies. The people were talking of lynching them, but the writer thought they would be left in the hands of the legal tribunals. So far as the writer can judge from
t, and three bells passing through his body, he fell and died almost immediately. Gen. Henry A. Wise, one of Virginia's most brave men, the able statesman and brilliant orator, arrived here yesterday, accompanied by his son, the gallant Capt. O. J. Wise, and has gone out to his beautiful farm in Princess Anne, about eight miles from this city, to recover his health, rest from the tells of war, and get ready to go forth again to assist in the great work of defending our soil from the invadin his health, rest from the tells of war, and get ready to go forth again to assist in the great work of defending our soil from the invading forces of Yankee hirelings. It is highly probable, indeed, almost certain, that if Wise's views and counsels had been heeded, the present war would be brought to an early termination. Virginia's magnificent strong hold would have been ours in the spring, our harbor open, and a heavy shipping business progressing in the seaport towns of the Old Dominion.
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