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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 27, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
ral loss—killed, wounded, and missing—9,665 (O. R.). I think I wrote you on the 17th that I was fighting Mr. Wise. Since then I have seen a Petersburg paper, announcing the wounding severely of George D. Wise, his nephew and aide, also of Peyton Wise, another nephew and aide-de-camp. On the 18th we found the enemy had retired to an inner line, which I had reason to believe was not strongly fortified. I followed them and immediately attacked them with my whole force, but could not breakature, I don't doubt he would before now have taken some action, either in his official despatches, or in some other way given publicity to such opinions of my services as would set at rest these idle stories. In our recent move we captured Peyton Wise, Lieutenant Colonel Forty-sixth Virginia Infantry. You may remember him as Mrs. Tully Wise's bright boy, when we were first married. I did not see him, as he was taken to City Point before I knew of his capture, but I sent word to General Pa
5, 144, 209. Williamsport, Md., July, 1863, II, 134,140, 201, 363, 364, 366, 372. Willings, I, 9. Wilmer, Mr., II, 151. Wilson, Senator, I, 379; II, 161, 165, 256, 257, 343, 344. Winegar, C. E., II, 99. Winslow, G. B., II, 79. Winsor, Harry, I, 384. Wise, Mrs. Henry A., I, 199. Wise, Mrs., II, 278. Wise, Geo. D., II, 206. Wise, Henry A., I, 17, 96, 139, 140, 245; II, 205, 238, 259, 270. Wise, John, II, 261. Wise, Nene, II, 277. Wise, Oby, I, 246. Wise, Peyton, II, 206, 238. Wise, Mrs., Tully, II, 278. Wises, II, 151, 278. Wistar, Isaac J., I, 226. Wister, Capt., II, 232. Wister, Francis, I, 254. Wister, Langhorne, II, 53. Wofford, W. T., II, 80, 86. Wood, Thos. J., I, 25, 29, 32, 33, 49, 51, 111. Woodruff, Isaac C., I, 228, 346, 355. Wool, John E., I, 111, 112, 148, 152, 153, 168, 170, 173, 249. Worsam, Henrietta Constantia, I, 2. Worsam, Richard, I, 2. Worth, Wm. J., I, 26, 52, 54, 87, 88, 98-101, 123-12
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, 1864. (search)
to Captain Owens, of the Washington Artillery, whose fire materially assisted in its capture. Officers and men mentioned for gallant conduct by regimental commanders: In Twenty-Seventh Regiment South Carolina Volunteers: Lieutenant Gelling, Company C, Acting-Adjutant; Color-Bearer Tupper; Private H. P. Foster, Company D, of Color Guard; First Sergeant Pickens B. Watts, Company E. In Seventh Battalion South Carolina Volunteers: Sergeant J. H. Onby, Company H, Color-Bearer, killed. In Eleventh Regiment South Carolina Volunteers: Lieutenant H. W. G. Bowman, Color-Bearer Hickman, Company B; Privates J. Jones, G. W. Hicks, Company K; Private A. P. Bulger, Company D; Private A. Mixson, Company F. In Twenty-Fifth South Carolina Volunteers: Private W. A. Dotteur, Company A; Private Wise, Company F; Sergeant B. P. Izlan, Company G; Private J. T. Shewmake, Company G; Sergeant H. J. Greer, Company B. I am, Captain, respectfully, Johnson Hagood, Brigadier-General Commanding.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
The following letters, selected from a large number received, coming from representative men of opposite sides well express the feeling with which this great enterprize is being prosecuted. From General U. S. Grant. New York, May 7, 1884. Peyton Wise, Esq., Chairman, &c.: Dear Sir,—I am in receipt of the formal invitation to be present at the opening of the Fair for the home of disabled Confederate soldiers on the 14th of this month, and your kind letter accompanying it. If it was pobe added to General Grant's honor that the above letter was written amidst his severe pecuniary troubles, and that he had previously contributed five hundred dollars ($500) to the fund. From General John B. Gordon. New York, May 10, 1884. Hon. Peyton Wise, Chairman: my Dear Sir,—you will understand how grateful to my sensibilities are the contents of your letter of May 5th, and how gladly I should accept the invitation of the committee and yourself. It seems now, however, impossible for m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
Huger that compliance with that order would leave Norfolk without ammunition. The report of the commanding officer at Roanoke Island led to an investigation of the loss of the post by a committee of Congress, and I give you the result in the language of Mr. Benjamin: I consulted the President, he says, whether it was best for the country that I should submit to unmerited censure or reveal to a congressional committee our poverty, and my utter inability to supply the requisitions of General Wise, and thus run the risk that the fact should become known to some of the spies of the enemy, of whose activity we were well assured. It was thought best for the public interest that I should submit to censure. It was a saying of General Lee that all the heroism of the country was not in the army, and I think the Secretary of War deserved a decoration. Heroic nature of Lee. But I must hasten on to what I regard as the greatest exhibition of the heroic nature of General Lee. I hav
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
Van Zandt, A. Jeff. Vaughan, Shelly Vanhorn. Major David N. Walker, P. P. Winston, Lieutenant W. H. Weisiger, Lieutenant Peyton Wise, J. W. White, E. Waddy, H. M. Walthall, W. Minor Woodward, Levi Wassermann, Philip Whitlock, James R. Werth, Dr. Jordan's Battery, represented by Sergeant James C. Read. But few of these old soldiers were without honorable scars. Wise's brigade, Thirty-fourth Virginia, General Peyton Wise in command; A. P. Hill veterans; Great Southern's Band and veteransGeneral Peyton Wise in command; A. P. Hill veterans; Great Southern's Band and veterans of the Fifth Maryland regiment; Ed. Murry Camp of Pine Bluff, Arkansas, commanded by J. B. Trulock; Confederate Veterans of Alexandria, with flag of Alexandria Light Infantry; Carpenter's Battery and Stonewall Brigade. Mexican Veterans. The ff Warrenton, Mrs. Dr. Stone of Washington, Mrs. Ellen Daingerfield of Alexandria, Mrs. Senator Hearst of California, Mrs. Peyton Wise, Colonel Hemphill of South Carolina, General Bradley T. Johnson of Maryland, Congressman Breckinridge of Arkansas, H
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee's Lieutenants. (search)
our Confederate leaders, from our chivalric, heroic President, down to the subordinates, were accustomed to say to their men not Go on! but Come on! Thus it came to pass that the list of our dead Generals were fearfully large, and that of those who survive, the large majority of them carry badges of honor in wounds received during the war. In peace. And since the war numbers of them have crossed the river— Lee, Cooper, Bragg, D. H. Hill, Forrest, Cheatham, Pendleton, Chilton, Hood, Wise, William Smith—and scores of others went before, and but a few months ago our grand old Chief and only President followed after. Thank God! many of them yet survive, and scores of them come to-day to pay tribute to their loved and honored old Chief, while many others though absent in body are present in spirit. We have been at some pains to compile an accurate list of surviving Confederate generals with their present residence, and we give it below. There may be a few omissions or ina
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
co-operate. General Whiting's infantry consisted of the brigades of Martin and Wise. He had the valuable assistance of Major-General D. H. Hill, then without a comattox and there was no enemy to flank him. General Hill, General Martin, and General Wise urged him to go forward, but he would not give the order. There was but a f and returned to his post at Wilmington. A few days afterwards this brigade and Wise's were placed under the command of General D. H. Hill, and on May 20th, anniverss, Martin's Brigade was formed on the right of Beauregard's line of battle, with Wise in reserve. After a heavy artillery duel of an hour the charge began from the lght flank. Going to the rear, on this errand, I met General Hill coming up with Wise's Brigade, delivered my message, and received his order to direct that brigade tur side, Major-General Smith commanded Grant's advance, and the small band under Wise, Ferebee, Graham, and others, heroically held the enemy at bay until our arrival
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relief of Confederates by National appropriation. (search)
, in meeting held January 24, 1896, expressed its disapprobation of the bill offered by Major P. J. Otey, looking to Federal aid to Confederate veterans. The following dignified expression (the report prepared by a committee consisting of General Peyton Wise, Major Norman V. Randolph, and General Thomas A. Brander, to whom the bill had been referred) was adopted with hearty acclaim: The Committee's report. The report of General Wise's committee, as adopted by Lee Camp, reads: Your comGeneral Wise's committee, as adopted by Lee Camp, reads: Your committee, to whom was some time since referred the questions presented by a report in the newspapers that Hon. Peter J. Otey, of the Sixth Congressional District of Virginia, was about to introduce in the United States House of Representatives a bill to make abandoned property, captured from the people of the Confederate States, and covered into the Treasury of the United States, available for the benefit of disabled Confederate soldiers, have had those questions under earnest consideration, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The South's Museum. (search)
ell, Mrs. O. A. Crenshaw, Miss C. B. Bosher, Mrs. Hugh Taylor, Mrs. Winn, Miss Guillaume, and other ladies who helped at the South Carolina table of the memorial bazaar of 1893. Georgia room. Mrs. Robert Emory Park, Macon, Ga., Regent; Mrs. J. Prosser Harrison, Richmond, Va., Vice-Regent; Miss Lucy Lily Temple, alternate. The following ladies, native Georgians, were in charge, with the Vice-Regent as chairman: Mrs. Barton Haxall Wise, Mrs. Thomas E. Binford, Mrs. Luther Warren, Mrs. Peyton Wise, Mrs. Ashton Starke, Mrs. Charles Ellis, and with the committee the following young ladies: Misses Tatum, Peebles, Causey, of Delaware, Mary De Noble, Morgan, of California, Jenkins, Harrison, and the Misses Mosby, daughters of the celebrated partisan ranger, Col. John Singleton Mosby. These ladies were all in full dress. Maryland room. This room was very artistic in its decorations. Oriole and black were the conspicuous colors in this room; over the main window of which the State
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