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Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 103 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 57 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 48 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 46 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 43 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 42 2 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 41 1 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 40 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 35 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Henry A. Wise or search for Henry A. Wise in all documents.

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Doc. 78.-Henry A. Wise's proclamation. Ripley, Va., July 6, 1861. To the true and loyal citizens of Virginia on all the Ohio border, and more particularly to those of Jackson County, I would earnestly appeal to come to the defence of the Commonwealth, invaded and insulted as she is by a ruthless and unnatural enemy. None need be afraid that they will be held accountable for past opinions, votes, or acts, under the delusions which have been practised upon the Northwestern people, if The sovereign State proclaimed it by her Convention, and by a majority of more than 100,000 votes at the polls. She has seceded from the old and established a new Confederacy. She has commanded and we must obey her voice. I come to execute her command — to hold out the olive branch to her true and peaceful citizens — to repel invasion from abroad, and subdue treason only at home. Come to the call of the country which owes you protection as her native sons. Henry A. wise, Brigadier-Gener
terday morning, and marched some eight miles through the mountains, reaching the turnpike some two or three miles in rear of the enemy, defeating an advanced post, and taking a couple of guns. I had a position ready for twelve guns near the main camp, and as guns were moving up, I ascertained that the enemy had retreated. I am now pushing on to Beverly, a part of Colonel Rosecrans's troops being now within three miles of it. Our success is complete, and almost bloodless. I doubt whether Wise and Johnson will unite and overpower me. The behavior of the troops in the action and toward the prisoners was admirable. G. B. McClellan, Major-Gen. Commanding. Statement of David L. Hart. Clarksburg, Va., June 16, 1861. The following is the statement of Mr. David L. Hart, the guide to General Rosecrans' column at the battle, which was fought on his father's farm: I was with General Rosecrans as guide at the battle of Rich Mountain. The enemy--four thousand strong — were str
nfusion, and he is now retreating on the road to St. George. I have ordered Gen. Morris to follow him up closely. I have telegraphed for the two Pennsylvania regiments at Cumberland to join Gen. Hill at Rowlesburg. The General is concentrating all his troops at Rowlesburg, and he will cut off Garnett's retreat near West Union, or, if possible, at St. George. I may say that we have driven out some ten thousand troops, strongly intrenched, with the loss of 11 killed and 35 wounded. The provision returns here show Garnett's force to have been ten thousand men. They were Eastern Virginians, Tennesseans, Georgians, and, I think, Carolinians. To-morrow I can give full details, as to prisoners, &c. I trust that Gen. Cox has, by this time, driven Wise out of the Kanawha Valley. In that case, I shall have accomplished the object of liberating Western Virginia. I hope the General-in-Chief will approve of my operations. G. B. Mcclellan, Maj.-Gen. commanding the Dep. of Ohio.
masters, are delighted with the army pageant, and come about in great freedom, and tell with joy how they had been frightened and humbugged. Several Secessionists who have fled to the hills have returned. One man who had fled, driving away his cattle, came back, and was so well pleased with the Northerners that he brought back his cattle to sell them to feed our soldiers. Where Gen. McClellan will go from this point is not known — perhaps to the Kanawha region, to pay his respects to Gov. Wise. Foolish as the Governor is, he is too wise to be caught in the vicinity of Gen. McClellan. We feel very proud of our wise and brave young Major-General. There is a future before him, if his life be spared, which he will make illustrious. He is the son-in-law of Major Marcy, of the United States army. In conversation with Major Marcy about his Red River exploration some years ago, he pleasantly remarked that then McClellan was a lieutenant under him, but now he (Marcy) was under McCle
A. Major-Generals in the Provisional army. 1. David E. Twiggs, Ga., Brig.-Gen. U. S. A. 2. Leonidas Polk, La., Episcopal Bishop of La. Brigadier-Generals in the Provisional army. 1. P. T. G. Beauregard, Capt. Engs. U. S. A. 2. Braxton Bragg, La., Capt. Art. U. S. A. 3. M. L. Bonham, S. C., Congressman from S. C. 4. John B. Floyd, Va., U. S. Sec. of War. 5. Ben. McCullough, Texas, Maj. Texas Rangers. 6. Wm. H. T. Walker, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Inft. U. S. A. 7. Henry A. Wise, Va., late Gov. of Va. 8. H. R. Jackson, Ga., late Minister to Austria. 9. Barnard E. Bee, S. C., Capt. Inft. U. S. A. 10. Nathan G. Evans, S. C., Major Inft. U. S. A. 11. John B. Magruder,, Va., Major Art. U. S. A. 12. Wm. J. Hardee, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Cav. U. S. A. 13. Benj. Huger, S. C., Major Ordnance U. S. A. 14. Robert S. Garnett, Va., Major Inft. U. S. A. There have been other appointments made, but they are not yet known outside of the War Office. Gens. Fauntl
s were stationed, at and near Norfolk about twenty thousand, in the vicinity of Richmond about seven thousand; that General Johnson had from fifteen to twenty thousand, exclusive of his recent reenforcement of five thousand; that in the neighborhood of Fairfax Court House there were at the time of his departure not more than from fifteen to twenty-five hundred. The remaining troops are scattered at different points throughout the State, embracing in part those who are under the command of Gen. Wise, and those who were recently defeated in several battles by Gen. McClellan. Our informant visited many of the soldiers when they were quartered near Richmond, for the purpose of obtaining an insight into their real sentiments, and though professing himself, for his own safety, to be a rank secessionist, he found many of them much dissatisfied, and they complained bitterly of the treatment to which they had been subjected. Quite a number did not hesitate to declare, when they ascertaine
well did they fight. The former fought like tigers, stood firm as trees, and saved us from utter and overwhelming defeat. Gen. Lyon saw their indomitable perseverance and bravery, and with almost his last breath praised their behavior in glowing terms. Major Porter was all along the line, cheering his men forward, even when bullets fell like hail, and scores were dropping all around him. Companies B, under Lieut. Graham, C, Capt. Mason, who was killed soon after entering into action, F, Capt. Wise, H, Capt. Gottschalk, I, Capt. Herron, and K, Capt. Cook, were in the very thickest of the fight. The three latter were afterward placed in ambush by Capt. Granger of the regulars. Lying down close to the brow of the hill, they waited for another attempt of the enemy to retake their position. On they came, in overwhelming numbers. Not a breath was heard among the Iowas till their enemies came within thirty-five or forty feet, when they poured the contents of their Minie muskets into th
well did they fight. The former fought like tigers, stood firm as trees, and saved us from utter and overwhelming defeat. Gen. Lyon saw their indomitable perseverance and bravery, and with almost his last breath praised their behavior in glowing terms. Major Porter was all along the line, cheering his men forward, even when bullets fell like hail, and scores were dropping all around him. Companies B, under Lieut. Graham, C, Capt. Mason, who was killed soon after entering into action, F, Capt. Wise, H, Capt. Gottschalk, I, Capt. Herron, and K, Capt. Cook, were in the very thickest of the fight. The three latter were afterward placed in ambush by Capt. Granger of the regulars. Lying down close to the brow of the hill, they waited for another attempt of the enemy to retake their position. On they came, in overwhelming numbers. Not a breath was heard among the Iowas till their enemies came within thirty-five or forty feet, when they poured the contents of their Minie muskets into th
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 199.-skirmish at Hawk's Nest, Va., August 20, 1861. (search)
th Ohio regiment had erected barricades, and were driven back with a loss of fifty killed and a number wounded and taken prisoners. Our loss was only two slightly wounded and one missing. Our forces captured quite a number of horses and equipments. I have just returned from General Wise's command, having left there on the night of the 20th, and after the skirmish was over. Our forces consisted of parts of three cavalry companies, amounting to about one hundred men, and the enemy numbered at least six hundred. Colonel Croghan, of our brigade, drove the enemy back to Hawk's Nest, taking two prisoners, and doing other damage not known at the time of my departure. Our loss was one killed and three wounded. General Wise was present during the action, and as cool and self-possessed as though no enemy were in the vicinity. Our brigade was encamped at Locust Lane, not less than five miles from the scene of action. D. B. Phillips, C. S. N., Med. Dir. of forces under Gen. H. A. Wise.