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Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 103 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 57 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 48 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 46 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 43 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 42 2 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 41 1 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 40 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 35 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Henry A. Wise or search for Henry A. Wise in all documents.

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und that General Banks was menacing Alexandria, and they decided to sacrifice one of the two places to hold the other. The troops have already reembarked, and are on the way to Alexandria. Fort De Russy takes its name from Colonel De Russy, who formerly commanded in this vicinity, and lives not far distant. Lieutenant-Colonel Bird was in command, though he reported to General Walker, whose headquarters were at Alexandria. The following officers are prisoners: Captains Stevens, Morran, Wise, Wright, Laird, and King; Lieutenants Denson, Fuller, Fogarty, Claydon, Trumbull, (Eng.,) Burbank, Hewey, Assenheimer, Fall, Hauk, Ball, Little, Barksdale, Spinks, Bringhurst, and Stout. From various sources we gather that the rebels here have about abandoned the idea of defending any of their navigable streams. When asked to account for their apparent neglect of so important a fort, they reply that this was considered merely as an experiment in engineering, (certainly a very creditable o
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 99.-the fire and blood of Revolution. (search)
ks and burning houses behind you, something worse than that, perhaps, in the shape of death produced by invisible and unconfrontable agencies, the State deprived of its labor, those laborers escaping by hundreds, or sold at half their value in the South, your fields unploughed, your public works ruined, land depressed to the lowest figure, State stocks, insurance stocks, bank stocks, railroad stocks, hawked at a mere song — these would be the immediate effects of the Fire and sword which Governor Wise proposes in his speech at Norfolk. A peaceable dissolution of the Union is sometimes suggested. Let us allow that the result could be effected peaceably. The next thing we should want would be a standing army. The John Brown affair cost us three hundred thousand dollars. Make the calculation. You would maintain a line of posts all along your frontier. You would also want a navy, though Norfolk only produces a few fishing-smacks, except the vessels built there by order of
s Seddon, Secretary of War. We heard last night, that the damage done by them on his place amounted to but little. They burnt two or three flouring-mills in the county, among them, the Dover Mill, some twenty-five miles above the city. General Henry A. Wise, who was at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. Hobson, in Goochland, narrowly escaped capture. He was at Mr. Hobson's when the enemy went to Mr. Seddon's place, and hearing of their presence in the neighbood, he put out for Richmond, af Stanard & Morson; destroyed a number of freight and other boats in the canal, and did considerable damage to the iron-works at Mannakio. The only damage done to the canal beside the destruction of boats, was cutting the lock at Simpson. General H. A. Wise was at the time on a visit to his son-in-law, whose farm adjoins that of Secretary Seddon, but fortunately became apprised of their approach in time to make his escape. He arrived in the city yesterday. The other detachment, that came t