Your search returned 68 results in 25 document sections:

1 2 3
ilton Stansifer, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. Statement of strength of brigade march 19, 1862. Actual strength of Brigade. Organizations. Rank and file present for duty.   Total. Trigg's 54th Virginia 424 Reported.424   Moore's 29th 189 Reported.189   Williams' 5th Kentucky 400 Estimated.400   Thompson's battalion 200 Estimated.200   Infantry     1,213 Shawhan's cavalry company     60 Bradley's battalion of mounted riflemen   200   Witcher's company of mounted riflemen   56   Stratton's company of mounted riflemen   25         281 Jeffress' battery, six pieces (four pieces without men and horses.     60 Total     1,614 No. 3.-report ofMaj. John B. Thompson, Twenty-first Virginia Battalion. Lebanon, Va., March 21, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report that on the evening of the 15th I received information that the enemy was approaching my position at Pound Gap, and that he was then abou
harles Duncan, appointed by Lieutenant-Colonel Simms, will remain adjutant of the battalion, and I ask his commission as adjutant of the First Mounted Rifles. Captain Witcher has a company of 64 mounted rifles, and Captain Stratton has another of the same, only partially made out. If these companies are made out they will be soon ar more, and would go in for the war rather than to be subject to the militia call. If such an arrangement cannot be made with your approbation I will keep Captains Witcher and Stratton as an independent squadron of mounted rifles, for it does not suit to mix soldiers from different States in the same corps of volunteers. Thems' regiment; battery of four pieces; Bradley's Mounted Rifles; Shawhan's cavalry squadron, composed of his Kentucky company and Otis Caldwell's Virginia company; Witcher's and Stratton's companies of Mounted Gunmen. Wither has now about 80 men; Stratton had 40 when he left here to go down into Logan County to recruit. His return
kees were attempting to escape by a private ford. Here they overtook two of the guns of the enemy, and took a large number of prisoners; a large number having previously laid down their arms in the woods to the right of the road, and in front of the lane last mentioned. While this was going on in front, General Jones had moved down the Carter Valley road to the left of the enemy's camp, to the intersection with the main road, a mile east of Rogersville, where he despatched a detachment of Witcher's battalion, and perhaps Dunn's, to take the town, occupied by a small force. These captured, perhaps, one hundred prisoners, and killed some five or six Yankees and renegades. The body of the command turned up the main road a short distance, to the road leading out toward the Relay and McKinney farms, and intersecting the river road. The enemy being drawn from their camp by the front attack, here encountered the command in their rear, and, after several sharp volleys, yielded themselves
talion Virginia cavalry, under Captain J. B. Thompson, were ordered to charge into Rogersville, and in so doing captured upwards of one hundred prisoners and some army supplies. For the same reason the Eighth was ordered to the river road. Colonel Witcher was ordered with his own and the Thirty-seventh battalion of Virginia cavalry to Smith's Ford. The Thirty-sixth battalion Virginia cavalry was held in reserve near town, and the Twenty-first regiment Virginia cavalry in the position first h. The old stage road being open, the Twenty-first having moved across towards the river, a party of one hundred and twenty-five of the enemy attempted to escape towards Rogersville, but were intercepted and all captured by the timely arrival of Witcher's, Claiborne's, and Smith's commands. By this time firing had ceased in front, and I felt assured of the surrender of the enemy, as proved to be the case. Two hundred and ninety-four prisoners were taken by my brigade acting alone. The Eigh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg. (search)
to rally along a crest of rocks and fence, from which he opened with artillery, raking the road. Jenkins' brigade were ordered to dismount and deploy over the difficult ground. This was done with marked effect and boldness. Lieutenant-Colonel Witcher, as usual, distinguishing himself by his courage and conduct. The enemy, thus dislodged, was closely pressed by the mounted cavalry, but made one effort at a counter charge, which was gallantly met and repulsed by Colonel James B. Gordon, commaunted nearly all day. General Jones was farther to the left on the Cavetown road, and the infantry was placed in position, covering Funkstown, with dismounted cavalry on each flank. The enemy's advance was handsomely repulsed, in which Lieutenant-Colonel Witcher's cavalry on foot, behind a stone fence immediately on the left of the turnpike, performed a very gallant part, standing their ground with unflinching tenacity. On the left a portion of Fitz. Lee's brigade, under Captain Wool-ridge,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
y had time to rally along a crest of rocks and fences, from which he opened with artillery, raking the road. Jenkins' brigade was ordered to dismount and deploy over the difficult ground. This was done with marked effect and boldness--Lieutenant-Colonel Witcher, as usual, distinguishing himself by his courage and conduct. The enemy, thus dislodged, was closely pressed by the mounted cavalry, but made one effort at a counter charge, which was gallantly met and repulsed by Colonel James B. Gordunted nearly all day. General Jones was farther to the left on the Cavetown road, and the infantry was placed in position, covering Funkstown, with dismounted cavalry on each flank. The enemy's advance was handsomely repulsed, in which Lieutenant-Colonel Witcher's cavalry, on foot behind a stone fence immediately on the left of the turnpike, performed a very gallant part, standing their ground with unflinching tenacity. On the left a portion of Fitz. Lee's brigade under Captain Wooldridge, F
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
y 4. Sandy Hook July 6. Near Hillsboro July 15-16. Snicker's Ferry July 17-18. Ashby's Gap and Berry's Ford July 19. Charlestown July 22. Near Kernstown July 23. Kernstown, Winchester, July 24. Bunker Hill and Martinsburg July 25. Duffield Station August 3. Cedar Creek August 12. Berryville August 16. Near Charlestown August 21-22. Falling Waters August 24. Duty at Remount Camp, Cumberland, Md., till November. Operations in Kanawha Valley against Witcher November 5-12. Newtown and Nineveh November 12. Rude's Hill, near Mount Jackson, November 22. Duty in District of the Kanawha and in the Shenandoah Valley till July, 1865. Mustered out July 20, 1865, and honorably discharged from service. Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 56 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 89 Enlisted men by disease, etc. Total 150. 1st New York Regiment Mounted Rifles. (Sometimes designated 7th New York Cavalry.) Fi
at Marion early on the sixteenth, and after completely routing him, pursued him to Wytheville, Virginia, capturing all his artillery and trains, and one hundred and ninety-eight prisoners. Wytheville, with its stores and supplies, was destroyed, as also the extensive lead-works near the town and the railroad bridges over Ready creek. General Stoneman then turned his attention toward Saltville, with its important salt-works. The garrison of that place, reinforced by Giltner's, Cosby's, and Witcher's commands, and the remnants of Duke's, all under command of Breckinridge in person, followed our troops as they moved on Wytheville, and on returning, General Stoneman met them at Marion, where he made preparations to give Breckinridge battle, and disposed his command so as to effectually assault the enemy in the morning, but Breckinridge retreated during the night, and was pursued a short distance into North Carolina, our troops capturing some of his wagons and caissons. General Stonem
southwest Virginia, having been duly advised of the movements of Stoneman's command, promptly made every effort to collect his scattered men to meet them; but in that inclement season it was impossible to get them together at so short a notice. Witcher's regiment of cavalry was nearly 100 miles away, in and near Mercer county, across the mountains to the northeast. A small body of militia, under General Preston, occupied the earthworks that defended the salt works at Saltville. Pushing forts. Much of it was soon repaired, and the lead and salt works were again quickly put in operation and the railway trains to running. Instances of heroism and fidelity to the Confederate cause in these days of extremity were not wanting. Colonel Witcher marched his command 90 miles in twenty-five hours, and reached Marion in time to aid in forcing the enemy to retire, although he was greatly inferior in numbers. Maj. J. Stoddard Johnston, General Breckinridge's adjutant-general, who was at
major; Cunningham, Richard H., Jr., lieutenant-colonel; Gilham, William, colonel; Kelly, Alfred D., major; Moseley, John R., major; Moseley, William P., lieutenant-colonel; Patton, John M., Jr., lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Shipp, Scott, major; Witcher, William A., lieutenant-colonel, colonel. Twenty-first Militia regiment: Jones, Warner T., colonel; Seawell, William H., major, lieutenant-colonel; Taliaferro, Thomas S., major; Taylor, Fielding L., lieutenant-colonel. Twenty-second Cavalrones, John R., lieutenant-colonel; Lee, Edwin G., major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Neff, John F., colonel; Spengler, Abraham, lieutenant-colonel, colonel. Thirty-fourth Cavalry battalion: McFarlane, John A., major; Straton, William, major; Witcher, Vinson A., major, lieutenant-colonel. Thirty-fourth Infantry regiment (Fourth Heavy Artillery prior to March 8, 1864?): Bagby, John R., major; Goode, John Thomas, colonel; Harrison, Randolph, lieutenant-colonel. Thirty-fourth Militia regi
1 2 3