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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 27 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 5 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 15 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 3, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Withers or search for Withers in all documents.

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seven o'clock his column was also put in motion; and Gladden's and Withers's other brigades were placed in line of battle, in due time, the lrode to Bragg's position; and, under his orders, by seven o'clock, Withers's division was put in motion, as has been stated. General Johnstottle way in its rear. In a little while Bragg's right wing, under Withers, deployed into line, but eight, nine o'clock came, and the divisioolk of my change.... By the first division General Bragg means Withers's; by the second, Ruggles's. The special orders as to movement of troops directed Bragg to move from Monterey to Mickey's with Withers's division, while Ruggles's division was to move from Monterey on th and deployed without interference or obstruction from Hardee's or Withers's division. But Bragg's order changing Ruggles's line of march, a in the front line of 9,024. Bragg commanded the second line. Withers's division formed his right wing. Jackson's brigade, 2,208 strong
burne. Polk's report. Bragg's report. Bragg's sketch. Jordan's statement. Withers's and Ruggles's reports. Gibson's and Gilmer's letters. Duke's life of Morga the prey, believed it entitled to the credit of the capture. Breckinridge's, Withers's, Ruggles's, Cheatham's, and other divisions, which helped to encircle and su-General Breckinridge, with his reserve division, pressing the enemy; Brigadier-General Withers, with his splendid division, greatly exhausted and taking a temporaryade simultaneously along our whole line, I proceeded to obtain orders from General Withers; but, before seeing him, was ordered by a staff officer to retire. This o following extracts are given from the reports of his subordinates. Major-General Withers, in his official report of June 20, 1862, says: This division wasagg's corps withdrawing before the distribution of the order, both Jackson and Withers concur that this order came direct from General Beauregard; while Chalmers, wh
ious afternoon, were found mingled in the confused and bloody conflict on the right. Chalmers was at one time detached from the command of his own brigade by General Withers, in order to lead one of these conglomerate commands; and Colonel Wheeler had charge of two or three regiments thrown together. General Withers strove, with General Withers strove, with great gallantry and skill, to bring order out of all this confusion; but in vain. Nelson's division encountered this line about seven o'clock, and after a contest of half an hour was driven back. The elation of yesterday would not yet permit these men to think themselves otherwise than invincible. The battle, not only here bu, and able man. Another gallant and able soldier and captain was lost to the service of the country, when Brigadier-General Gladden, commanding First Brigade, Withers's division, Second Army Corps, died from a severe wound received on the 6th instant, after having been conspicuous to his whole corps and the army for courage and