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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 4 (search)
re. April 3, Monday. Albany, Ga All of us very miserable at the thought of parting. Mrs. Meals goes with us as far as Wooten's, on her way to Gopher Hill, so sister and the children are left alone. Brother Troup has been ordered to Gen. Wofford's command in North Georgia, and this separation adds to her feeling of loneliness, but she and the children will soon join us in Washington, so it won't matter so much. The ride to Albany was very unpleasant, the sun scorching hot, the glare aggage, and we had to foot it ourselves. The Yankees were expected every minute, and as this was our very last chance to escape, there was a great rush to get on board the train. Brother Troup had not been able to carry out his order to join Gen. Wofford, and sent our trunks to the station on a government wagon, and Gen. Cobb gave Mr. Toombs transportation for it on one of his cars, as far as Milledgeville. We gratified a pretty girl from Montgomery, and her escort, by taking their baggage to
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
tive of the dauntless spirit of these men, that when General Humphreys (of Mississippi) was ordered to withdraw his troops from the charge, he thought there was some mistake, and retired to a captured battery, near the swale between the two ridges, where he halted, and, when ordered to retire to the new line a second time, he did so under protest. The troops engaged with me in the fight of the 2d were mostly Georgians, as follows: The four Georgia brigades of Generals Benning, Anderson, Wofford, and Semmes, General Kershaw's South Carolina Brigade, General Law's Alabama Brigade, General Barksdale's (afterward General Humphrey's) Mississippi Brigade, and General Robertson's Texas Brigade. Our men had no thought of retreat. They broke every line they encountered When the order to withdraw was given, a courier was sent to General Lee, informing him of the result of the day's work. Before pursuing this narrative further, I shall say a word or two concerning this assault. I am sa
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 48: battle of Cedar Creek, or Belle Grove. (search)
n, thus placing our right and rear in great danger, and Wharton was ordered to form his division at once, and take position to hold the enemy's cavalry in check. Wofford's brigade of Kershaw's division, which had become separated from the other brigades, was ordered up for the same purpose. Discovering that the 6th corps could noke provision against the enemy's cavalry, and discovered a large body of it seriously threatening that flank, which was very much exposed. Wharton's division and Wofford's brigade were put in position on Pegram's right, and several charges of the enemy's cavalry were repulsed. I had no cavalry on that flank except Payne's very smed. While the latter were being replaced by other guns, the force that had remained with Ramseur and Goggin gave way also. Pegram's and Wharton's divisions, and Wofford's brigade had remained steadfast on the right and resisted all efforts of the enemy's cavalry, but no portion of this force could be moved to the left without lea
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 13: campaign in Virginia.-Bristol Station.-mine Run.-Wilderness. (search)
vouacked the night of the 5th. By the route he should have marched he could have reached Verdiersville in twenty miles. He consumed one day and a half of precious time in getting there. Though late in his arrival, no one could have made dispositions to assume the offensive with more celerity, or have attacked with more promptness. Hancock was now in turn assailed. Holding his front with three brigades under Gregg, Benning, and Law, Longstreet threw four-viz., Mahone's, G. T. Anderson's, Wofford's, and Davis'saround Hancock's left flank. Attacked in flank and front, Hancock's troops were routed and driven rapidly back three quarters of a mile to his line of works. It was a well-planned, well-executed movement. As Longstreet rode down the plank road at the head of his column he came opposite to his brigades, which had made the flank movement, and were drawn up parallel to the plank road and some sixty feet from it. He was mistaken in the thick woods for the Federals, and a vol
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Kershaw. (search)
tone wall. Along this wall the division was then formed, Semmes in reserve to me and Barksdale on my left, supported by Wofford in reserve. Artillery was also placed along the wall to my right, and Colonel DeSausseure's 15th South Carolina regimenthe Georgia regiment with them to fall back to the stone house, whither I followed them. On emerging from the wood I saw Wofford coming in in splendid style. My left wing had held the enemy in check along their front and lost no ground. The enemy gave way at Wofford's advance, and with him the whole of my left wing advanced to the charge, sweeping the enemy before them, without a moment's stand, across the stone wall beyond the wheat field, up to the foot of the mountain. At the same time, found the Third South Carolina and the regiment of Semmes' brigade. I moved them up to the stone wall, and finding that Wofford's men were coming out, I retained them at that point to check any attempt of the enemy to advance. It was now near nigh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Brigadier-General Perry of battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
McLaws' on the right. I then received an order from Major-General Mc-Laws' to form my brigade on the right of Brigadier-General Wofford's brigade. This threw me some distance to the right of the Old Mine road. I at once formed my line of battle,e of skirmishers and advance. I did so for about one and one-half miles, encountering no enemy. I halted with Brigadier-General Wofford's brigade on my left. Brigadier-General Wilcox not receiving orders to advance at the time, did not join my right. General Wofford having become disconnected from the lice on his left, determined to bivouack for the night. Accordingly, I threw out a strong line of pickets and disposed my men for rest. They were very much exhausted, owing to the nature o just left. Having retaken that position, I remained until morning, every thing in my front continuing quiet. Brigadier-General Wofford having re-established his connection with the line on his left, the line of battle was advanced, I moving in co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
trative of the dauntless spirit of these men, that when General Humphreys (of Mississippi) was ordered to withdraw his troops from the charge, he thought there was some mistake, and retired to a captured battery near the swale between the tw6 ridges, where he halted, and when ordered to retire to the new line a second time, he did so under protest. The troops engaged with me in the fight of the 2d were mostly Georgians, as follows: The four Georgia brigades of Generals Benning, Anderson, Wofford and Semmes, General Kershaw's South Carolina brigade, General Laws' Alabama brigade, General Barksdale's (afterward General Humphrey's) Mississippi brigade, and General Robertson's Texas brigade. Our men had no thought of retreat. They broke every line they encountered. When the order to withdraw was given a courier was sent to General Lee informing him of the result of the day's work. Before pursuing this narrative further, I shall say a word or two concerning this assault. I am sati
tisfactory, and claimed the protection of the Government from the secessionists, who were forcing them into the ranks against their will. The gunboat Resolute had given them protection through the day, but at night they had to seek shelter in the woods.--(Doc. 159.) General Drayton, at Hardeeville, South Carolina, assured the Governor of that State that he had neither seen nor heard of any act of pillage or incendiarism in any direction on the part of the slaves.--(Doc. 172.) Colonel Wofford's Eighteenth regiment of Georgia Volunteers left Richmond, Va., for Manassas, via Fredericksburg.--National Intelligencer. Captain A. H. Foote was appointed Flag-officer of the fleet in the Western Military Department. He thus ranks with the Major-General. This arrangement will obviate any possible conflict of authority between the commanders respectively of the land and water forces. The following military appointments were made to-day, viz.: Assistant Adjutant-Generals of
ven the enemy well up the side of the mountain, capturing several of his guns, found his left exposed by the flank movement of the enemy, heretofore mentioned, and was compelled to retire, abandoning his captured guns. On our right, McLaws and Hood continued to press the enemy until night set in and ended the sanguinary conflict. The enemy's loss during this day's fight was very heavy, particularly on that portion of the field where Benning's brigade, (of Hood's division,) Barksdale's and Wofford's, (of McLaws's,) and Wilcox's and Wright's, (of Anderson's division,) were engaged. Our own loss was slight, except in Wright's and Wilcox's brigades, in both of which it was very heavy, amounting to more than half of the forces engaged. Early next morning--Friday, the third--preparations were made for a general attack along the enemy's whole line, while a large force was to be concentrated against his centre, with the view of retaking the heights captured and abandoned the day before
n our passage would admit. Each step forward brought nearer and nearer to us the heavy Federal lines, as they advanced, cheering over their success and the possession of our dead and wounded. Finally, I gave instructions to General Law and Colonel Wofford, directing the two brigades, to order their men to fix bayonets; and, when the enemy came within seventy-five or a hundred yards, I ordered the men to front and charge. They obeyed promptly, with a genuine Confederate yell, and the Federalsrray, heavy columns of Federal infantry; not less than two corps were in sight to oppose my small command, numbering, approximately, two thousand effectives. However, with the trusty Law on my right, in the edge of the wood, and the gallant Colonel Wofford in command of the Texas brigade on the left, near the pike, we moved forward to the assault. Notwithstanding the overwhelming odds of over ten to one against us, we drove the enemy from the wood and corn field back upon his reserves, and fo
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