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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 116 4 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 82 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abraham, Heights or Plains of, (search)
Abraham, Heights or Plains of, Near Quebec, named from Abraham Martin, who owned a piece of land there in the early times of the colony. On this plateau was fought a battle between French and English, Sept. 13, 1759, gaining Canada for the English. Both commanders, Montcalm and Wolfe, were killed, the latter at the moment of victory. See Canada; Montcalm De St. Veran; Wolfe, James.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barre, Isaac, 1726-1802 (search)
cer; born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1726. His parents Isaac Barre. were French, his father being a small tradesman in Dublin. Isaac entered the British army at the age of twenty-one, and participated in the expedition against Louisburg in 1758. Wolfe was his friend, and appointed him major of brigade; and in May, 1759, he was made adjutant-general of Wolfe's army that assailed Quebec. He was severely wounded in the battle on the Plains of Abraham, by which he lost the sight of one eye. BarreWolfe's army that assailed Quebec. He was severely wounded in the battle on the Plains of Abraham, by which he lost the sight of one eye. Barre served under Amherst in 1760; and was the official bearer of the news of the surrender of Montreal to England. In 1761 he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and the same year he obtained a seat in Parliament, where he found himself in opposition to the ministry. For this offence he was deprived of his offices, given him as a reward for his services in America. He was the warm friend of the colonies, and made able speeches in Parliament in their favor. Barre was one of the supposed authors
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carleton, Sir Guy, Lord Dorchester 1724- (search)
Carleton, Sir Guy, Lord Dorchester 1724- civil and military officer; born in Stra- Guy Carleton. bane, Ireland, Sept. 3, 1724; entered the Guards at an early age, and became a lieutenant-colonel in 1748. He was aide to the Duke of Cumberland in the German campaign of 1757; was with Amherst in the siege of Louisburg in 1758; with Wolfe at Quebec (1759) as quartermaster-general; and was a brigadier-general at the siege of Belle Isle, where he was wounded. He was also quartermaster-general in the expedition against Havana in 1762, and in 1767 he was made lieutenant-governor of Quebec. The next year he was appointed governor. In 1772 he was promoted to major-general, and in 1774 was made governor-general of the Province of Quebec. In an expedition against the forts on Lake Champlain in 1775 he narrowly escaped capture; and at the close of the year he successfully resisted a siege of Quebec by Montgomery. The next spring and summer he drove the Americans out of Canada, and to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carleton, Thomas 1736-1817 (search)
Carleton, Thomas 1736-1817 Military officer; born in England in 1736; joined the British army and came to America in 1755 as an ensign in Wolfe's command; was promoted lieutenant-general in 1798, and general in 1803. During the Revolutionary War he received a wound in the naval battle with Arnold on Lake Champlain in 1776. He died in Ramsgate, England, Feb. 2, 1817.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Crown Point, (search)
Edward and William Henry. The post remained in possession of the French until 1759, when the approach of a large English force, under General Amherst, caused the garrison there to join that at Ticonderoga, in their flight down the lake to its outlet. Amherst remained at Crown Point long enough to construct a sufficient number of rude boats to convey his troops, artillery, and baggage, and then started to drive the enemy before him across the St. Lawrence. The delay prevented his joining Wolfe at Quebec. When ready to move, it was mid-autumn ´╝łOct. 11), and heavy storms compelled him to return to Crown Point, after going a short distance down the lake. There he placed his troops in winter quarters, where they constructed a fortress, whose picturesque ruins, after the lapse of more than a century, attested its original strength. The whole circuit, measuring along the ramparts, was a trifle less than half a mile; and it was surrounded by a broad ditch, cut out of the solid limesto
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dayton, Elias, 1737-1807 (search)
Dayton, Elias, 1737-1807 Military officer; born in Elizabethtown, N. J., in July, 1737; fought with the Jersey Blues under Wolfe at Quebec; was member of the committee of safety at the beginning of the Revolution, and became colonel of the 3d New Jersey Regiment. He served in New York and New Jersey; fought in several battles, the last at Yorktown, and in January, 1783, was made a brigadier-general. He was a member of Congress in 1787-88, and was afterwards in the New Jersey legislature. He died in Elizabethtown, July 17, 1807.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Des Barres, Joseph Frederick Wallet, 1722-1824 (search)
Des Barres, Joseph Frederick Wallet, 1722-1824 Military officer; born in England, of French ancestry, in 1722; educated for the army at the Royal Military College at Woolwich, and, as lieutenant, came to America in 1756, and raising 300 recruits in Pennsylvania and Maryland, formed them into a corps of field-artillery. He distinguished himself as an engineer in the siege of Louisburg (q. v.)and was aide-de-camp to Wolfe when he fell at Quebec, that general dying in Des Barres's arms. He was active in the retaking of Newfoundland in 1762, and for ten years afterwards he was employed in a coast survey of Nova Scotia. He prepared charts of the North American coasts in 1775 for Earl Howe, and in 1777 he published The Atlantic Neptune, in two large folios. He was made governor of Cape Breton, with the military command of Prince Edward's Island, in 1784, and in 1804, being then about eighty-two years of age, he was made lieutenant-governor of Prince Edward's Island. He died in Ha
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), French and Indian War. (search)
re put in motion, one to go up the St. Fort William Henry. Lawrence, to capture Quebec, another to drive the French from Lake Champlain, and force them back to Canada; and a third to attack Fort Niagara, at the mouth of the Niagara River. General Wolfe commanded the expedition against Quebec, General Amherst led the troops against the French on Lake Champlain, and General Prideaux commanded the expedition against Fort Niagara. Prideaux was killed in besieging Fort Niagara, but it was captuer the lead of Sir William Johnson, in July. Amherst drove the French from Lake Champlain into Canada, and they never came back; and he built the strong fortress on Crown Point whose picturesque ruins still attract the attention of the tourist. Wolfe attacked Quebec, and at the moment of victory he was killed. Montcalm, the commander of the French, also perished on the field. In 1760 the French tried to recapture Quebec, but were unsuccessful. Early in September Amherst went down the St. L
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
and in 1755, at Alexandria, Va., he planned four expeditions against the French. It is not necessary to speak in detail of the war that followed. After Braddock's defeat, near the forks of the Ohio, which occurred on July 9, 1755, England herself took active measures for prosecuting the war. On Nov. 25, 1758, Forbes captured Fort Duquesne, which thus passed into the possession of the English, and was named Fort Pitt, in honor of the great minister. In 1759 Quebec was captured by General Wolfe; and the same year Niagara fell into the hands of the English. In 1760 an English force, under Major Rogers, moved westward from Niagara, to occupy the French posts on the upper lakes. They coasted along the south shore of Erie, the first English-speaking people that sailed its waters. Near the mouth of the Grand River they met in council the chiefs of the great warrior Pontiac. A few weeks later they took possession of Detroit. Thus, says Mr. Bancroft, was Michigan won by Great B
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grey, Charles, Earl 1729- (search)
Grey, Charles, Earl 1729- Military officer; born in England Oct. 23, 1729; was aidede-camp to Wolfe, at Quebec, in 1759; was commissioned lieutenant-colonel in 1761; and, as colonel, accompanied General Howe to Boston in 1775, who gave him the rank of major-general. He led the party that surprised General Wayne in the night. He was an active commander in the battle of Germantown (q. v.) and as a marauder on the New England coast in the fall of 1778. He surprised and cut in pieces Baylor's dragoons at Tappan. For these and other services in America he was made a lieutenant-general in 1783. He became a general in 1795; was elevated to the peerage in 1801; and was the father of the celebrated English statesman of the same name. He died Nov. 14, 1807.
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