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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
yond Rockcastle River, supported by a detachment of Wolford's cavalry. On the 17th of October, Garrard reportenson's brigade, Kenny's battery, and a battalion of Wolford's cavalry. The 4th Kentucky, 10th Kentucky, the 14gh the rain, his cavalry about daylight encountered Wolford's pickets, who after firing fell back on the reservned stand, in which they were promptly supported by Wolford with the rest of his battalion, and soon after by t up by Manson, who had been advised by courier from Wolford of the attack. Colonel Manson proceeded in person ollicoffer had deployed his brigade, and had forced Wolford and the 10th Indiana to fall back, almost capturing the horses of Wolford's men, who were fighting on foot. A portion of Wolford's command, under his immediate cWolford's command, under his immediate charge, and Vanarsdall's company of the 10th Indiana, rallied on the 4th Kentucky when it appeared, the remainde Indiana, 4th Kentucky, 2d Minnesota, 9th Ohio, and Wolford's cavalry. Colonels McCook and Fry were among the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Knoxville, Tenn.: November 17th-December 4th, 1863. (search)
ade, Col. William A. Hoskins: 12th Ky., Maj. Joseph M. Owens; 8th Tenn., Col. Felix A. Reeve. Tennessee Brigade, Col. John S. Casement. cavalry Corps, Brig.-Gen. James M. Shackelford. First division, Brig.-Gen. William P. Sanders (m w), Col. Frank Wolford. Staff loss: m w, 1. First Brigade, Col. Frank Wolford, Lieut.-Col. Silas Adams: 1st Ky., Lieut.-Col. Silas Adams; 11th Ky.,----; 12th Ky.,----; Law's Howitzer Battery,----. Brigade loss: k, 5; w, 9; m, 10==24. Second Brigade, Lieut.-CoCol. Frank Wolford, Lieut.-Col. Silas Adams: 1st Ky., Lieut.-Col. Silas Adams; 11th Ky.,----; 12th Ky.,----; Law's Howitzer Battery,----. Brigade loss: k, 5; w, 9; m, 10==24. Second Brigade, Lieut.-Col. Emery S. Bond: 112th Ill. (mounted infantry), Maj. Tristram T. Dow; 8th Mich.,----; 45th Ohio (mounted infantry),----; 15th Ind. Battery,----. Brigade loss: k, 25; w, 63; m, 64==152. Third Brigade, Col. Charles D. Pennebaker: 11th Ky., Col. S. Palace Love; 27th Ky., Lieut.-Col. John H. Ward. Brigade loss: k, 4; w, 12; m, 1==17. Second division. First Brigade, Col. Israel Garrard: 2d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George A. Purington; 7th Ohio,----; 2d Tenn. (infantry),----. Brigade loss: m, 5. Total
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cavalry operations in the West under Rosecrans and Sherman. (search)
many reasons, but one of the most notable things pertaining to it was the pursuit and capture of the raider and his men. The pursuit began at Burksville immediately upon Morgan's passage of Cumberland River. The night of the passage four Kentucky cavalry regiments, the 1st, 8th, 9th, and 12th, under Generals J. M. Shackelford and E. H. Hobson, both Kentuckians, were concentrated at Marrow Bone, only a few miles west of Burksville. Four noted Kentucky officers commanded these regiments, Frank Wolford, B. H. Bristow, R. T. Jacob, and E. W. Crittenden. At Bardstown the pursuers were joined by three Ohio regiments. A month later this same Federal cavalry and several other regiments were organized at Camp Nelson in Kentucky by Burnside for an expedition to east Tennessee. It was placed under command of Shackelford, who led it through Williamsburg and Big Creek Gap to Kingston. The infantry force under Burnside moved out at the same time and took possession of Knoxville. Shackelfor
of orderlies riding to and fro, gave token that the conflict was beginning in earnest. Heavy skirmishing commenced along our left. General Sanders, with part of Wolford's brigade of his division, was in front. The fire was unceasing for three hours. The ambulances, about ten o'clock, commenced their unhappy work, and were observer hour unrelieved. They stood up like heroes, every man of them, and amid that hell of shot, gave blow for blow and shout for shout. The old mountain wolf, Colonel Wolford, with his grim and stolid courage, was there. Colonel Bond, at the head of his glorious regiment. the One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois, with his smiling, eatinies of our left are in the hands of Casement and his new men. On the south bank of the Holston, Colonel Cameron's brigade has charge of our interests, aided by Wolford's brigade. Altogether, we feel quite confident to look after our own safety until Bragg and Grant have arranged their little affairs. I hope every thing from th
in the morning our brigade crossed the river on the pontoon-bridge, joined Colonel Wolford, and went to Philadelphia. Here we found the rebs, had sharp skirmishing with silence to keep the rebels from firing on us. Twenty-seventh, part of Colonel Wolford's command remained in this ditch, while the rest made Headquarters on whatey, in solid columns, upon us. Our corps was put into position; our division — Wolford's — in front, contesting every inch of ground. Our regiment was ordered to tavest before the sickle. While the air was filled with bullets and shells, Colonel Wolford rode to and fro along the front line, giving the men instruction how to fight to advantage. When the right of the line was being overpowered, Colonel Wolford rode up to the house, and ordered Lieutenant-Colonel Ward to send four companiesn we ever did before. Suffice it to be explanation enough to say, that Colonel Frank Wolford commanded our division, Colonel C. D. Pennebaker our brigade, and Lieut
nd to force them to pay heavy sums to purchase their liberation. How the spoils so infamously extorted are divided, has not transpired to the public information. For partisan political ends, General John B. Huston was arrested at midnight preceding the election, and hurried off under circumstances of shameful aggravation. He was, however, released in a few days; but that does not atone for the criminality of his malicious arrest and false imprisonment. The battle-scarred veteran, Colonel Frank Wolford, whose name and loyal fame are part of his country's proudest memories, and whose arrest for political vengeance should put a nation's check to blush, is yet held in durance vile, without a hearing and without an accusation, so far as he or his friends can ascertain. Lieutenant-Governor Jacobs, whose yet unclosed wounds were received in battle for his country, was made a victim to partisan and personal enmity, and hurried without a hearing and without any known accusation through
, 76-79. Wilmer, Bishop, 634. Wilmington, N. C. Harbor defense, 171. Wilson, General, 131, 544, 592. Gen. J. H., 354, 594, 595, 596. Winchester, Va., Battle of, 449-50. Federal troops routed, 367. Winder, Capt. C. B., 419. Gen. Charles S., 90-91, 93, 94, 95. Death, 266. Act of heroism, 266-67. Gen. John H., 10, 418, 505-06. Winslow, Captain, 214. Winston, Col. 358. Wirz, Major, Henry, 505. Trial and execution, 417-18. Vindication, 418-20. Wise, Lieutenant, 575. Gen. Henry A., 122, 133, 575. Withers, General, 51. Wofford, General, 454. Wolford, Col. Frank., 397. Wood, Col., John Taylor, 188, 222, 576, 589, 590, 595. Woods, General, 36. Wool, General, 69, 74, 82, 497-98. Woolley, Col. R. W., 30. Worth, Jonathan, 624. Protest of validity of election of North Carolina, 625. Worthington, Col., Thomas, 52. Wright, General, 301. Wyndham, Col., Percy, 92. Y Yorktown. Evacuation, 78. Z Zollicoffer, Gen. Felix K., 15, 16, 18, 19, Death, 17.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ou progress with your work. I am sir, etc., L. Thomas, Adjutant-General. On the 14th of July, 1861, Nelson in a letter from Cincinnati reported what had been done toward carrying out the foregoing instructions. He said that he had appointed Speed S. Fry, of Danville, to be colonel of the First regiment of infantry in the proposed expedition to Tennessee; Theophilus T. Garrard, of Clay county, colonel of the Second; Thomas E. Bramlette, of Adair county, colonel of the Third; and Frank Wolford, of Casey county to be lieutenant-colonel of the cavalry regiment authorized, reserving the colonelcy for W. J. Landram, who served in a cavalry regiment during the war with Mexico. He stated also that runners had been started in all directions, and that thirty companies of infantry and five of cavalry would soon be raised, and that he would muster in the companies now on duty immediately. Thus it will be seen that almost two months before the alleged violation of the neutrality of Ken
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
ere until morning; but during the night, which was dark and rainy, he was overtaken by General Dumont, who had left Nashville with the First Kentucky cavalry, Colonel Wolford, and the Twenty-first Kentucky infantry. Morgan's pickets were in a house, and before the alarm could be given Wolford's cavalry charged full upon the camp aWolford's cavalry charged full upon the camp and came near capturing the whole command. Morgan, with fifteen of his men, escaped, and on the 6th reached Sparta at the foot of the Cumberland mountains, east of Lebanon, where during the next three days fifty of his men joined him. One hundred and twenty-five of his men were captured and six killed. Most of the rest made their wreinforcements, as the whole people seemed ready to rise and join me, but I received information that large bodies of cavalry under Gen. Green Clay Smith and Colonels Wolford, Metcalfe, Munday and Wynkoop were endeavoring to surround me at this place, so I moved [21st] on to Crab Orchard. There I attached my portable battery to t
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
ercept him. In recognition of his great services he was, on the suggestion of General Bragg, commissioned brigadier-general December 11, 1862. His exploits made it necessary to garrison every important town in Kentucky and Southern Ohio and Indiana. His most wonderful exploit was the great raid through those States from the 2d to the 20th of July, 1863. With about 2,000 horsemen and four cannon he crossed the Cumberland river near Burkesville. Moving rapidly forward he met and defeated Wolford's Kentucky Union command. At Brandenburg on the Ohio his bold raiders captured two steamboats. Then, while one half of the command crossed the Ohio and attacked about 1,000 men on the Indiana side, Morgan with the other half turned his artillery on two gunboats that had come down the river to prevent the crossing, and drove them off. Then crossing the river Morgan dispersed or captured the whole Federal force. Next he captured Corydon and about 1,200 citizens and soldiers who tried to de
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