hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 11 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Adrian Woll or search for Adrian Woll in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

ls prevailed; but General Johnston, many years after, spoke of it to the writer as a strong temptation wisely resisted. He stated that this incident had directed his attention to the careers of men who had enlisted in a foreign army, and that his observation was that the greater the services rendered by them the more jealously were they regarded by the native rulers, and that this prejudice against the foreigner was sure to thwart their ablest efforts. I think he cited, as one instance, General Woll, of the Mexican Army, a Belgian, whom he esteemed as its best soldier. The circumstances attending the graduation of Albert Sidney Johnston were somewhat unusual. He had won his way by hard labor to a grade in mathematical attainment only excelled by W. H. C. Bartlett, afterward distinguished as a professor of the institution, to whom he accorded an easy eminence; and by Mr. Twiss, who was inferior to Bartlett only. Mr. Davis says: Johnston did not highly value class-standing,
ddress. the President's Evasive reply. Houston's do-nothing policy. another Mexican invasion. Woll enters San Antonio and captures the court and bar. bill passed by Congress for the public defensn by another Mexican invasion, repeating that led by Vasquez in March. On September 11th General Adrian Woll entered San Antonio with a force of 1,200 men. Congress, warned, by Vasquez's invasion, os called a pocket-veto. The want of an organized force and a competent commander was felt when Woll burst suddenly upon San Antonio with his rancheros. He captured the judge and bar of the districhree in all. The Texan minute-men made a gallant fight at the crossing of the Salado with part of Woll's force, but suffered a heavy blow in the loss of Captain Dawson and fifty-three men, who were surrounded and massacred by the Mexicans. After a week's occupation of San Antonio, Woll retreated with his prisoners and plunder unmolested, having attained the object of the expedition-to contradict