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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 4 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 13 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 12 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for John Taylor Wood or search for John Taylor Wood in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
h of March. I have been told by an officer of high rank, who was present in the fort, that if the Merrimac had fired a shot at it on the 8th, the general in command would have surrendered it; and, if I am not very much mistaken, I have seen a despatch from that general to the effect that if the Merrimac passed Fortress Monroe it must necessarily fall! After this, one can well understand what Napoleon has said in reference to the moral as compared to the physical effect in war. But John Taylor Wood, C. S. N., a lieutenant on the Merrimac, speaks in Battles and leaders of the Civil war of the vessel's condition as she lay at anchor off Sewell's Point: The armor was hardly damaged, though at one time our ship was the focus on which were directed at least one hundred heavy guns, afloat and ashore. But nothing outside escaped. Two guns were disabled by having their muzzles shot off. The ram was left in the side of the Cumberland. One anchor, the smoke-stack, and the steampipes w
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
guns, but unless both ships could bring their broadsides to bear on their antagonist it was bound to be a one-sided battle, for the Stonewall's powerful and modern Armstrong rifles were mounted in two turrets and could be brought quickly to bear over a wide range. The Stonewall, a dread Confederate destroyer Commodore Thomas T. Craven trips from Bermuda to Wilmington, and was then fitted out as a commerce-destroyer, being renamed the Tallahassee and put under the command of Commander John Taylor Wood. She set out from Wilmington in August. A successful three weeks cruise extended as far as Halifax; nearly thirty coasting and fishing vessels were destroyed. In October, she became the Olustee and took seven prizes. This ended her career as a cruiser, for there was now more pressing work for her to do. Once more she became a blockade-runner, and, as the Chameleon, went to Bermuda with a cargo of cotton. Bringing back much needed supplies for Lee's army, she was unable, in Jan
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
vember, 1863. November 2, 1863. Unsuccessful attempt upon Sumter by a boat expedition. December, 1863. December 6, 1863. Monitor Weehawken founders in Charleston Harbor. Over 30 lives lost. December 5, 1863. Fight between the U. S. gunboat Marblehead and Confed. batteries on Stono River, S. C. Confederates defeated. February, 1864. February 2, 1864. Capture and destruction of U. S. S. Underwriter, Actg. Master Westervelt, by Confed. attack under Comdr. J. T. Wood, in Neuse River, N. C. February 18, 1864. Federal sloop-of-war Housatonic sunk off Charleston, S. C., by Confed. submarine torpedo-boat H. L. Hunley. February 16-29, 1864. Bombardment of Fort Powell, Ala., by Adml. Farragut. March, 1864. March 6, 1864. U. S. gunboat Peterhoff sunk by collision off Wilmington, N. C. March 11-15, 1864. A naval expedition from Brashear City captures camp, arms, and flag on Atchafalaya River, La. April, 1864. Apri