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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 20 2 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 6 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 9.. You can also browse the collection for William Wood or search for William Wood in all documents.

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r his men being absent from training diverse times. March 4, 1633-4, the Ware att Misticke is granted to John Winthrop Esq psent Gouvr & to Mr Matthewe Cradocke of London mercht. to enjoy to them & their heires forever. Of this locality William Wood, in his New England's Prospect, published in London in 1634, says of Misticke: there be not many houses as yet. At the head of this river are great and spacious ponds, whither the alewives press to spawn. On the east side is Master Cradock's England, and what he could not provide himself with, Cradock promised to send after him. Cradock, in a letter to Winthrop, September 13, 1636, says, I am harteley glad to heare of the good approbacion of our newe Gouvernour there Mr Vane. In Wood's works there is no mention of a house on Cradock's plantation; there surely was none of brick, like the present pretentious structure. All the ground, as well upland as meadowe, lyeing & being betwixte the lands of Mr Nowell & Mr Wilson, on th