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Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907 6 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
es; in 1865, Caleb W. Jaquith, Eugene T. Miles, William Kimball, William O. Brown, John W. Kimball. The town-clerk during these years was John T. Farwell. The town-treasurer, Ebenezer Torrey. 1861. A legal town-meeting was held April 7th, to consider the propriety of appropriating money in anticipation of a call being made by the President for troops to sustain the Government, at which it was voted to appropriate ten thousand dollars; and Ebenezer Torrey, Moses Wood, C. Marshall, William Woodbury, Levi Doune, A. P. Kimball, and Timothy S. Wilson were chosen a committee to have charge of the expenditure of the money. They were to provide for the comfort of the families of soldiers who may be called into active service, to furnish the volunteers with clothing, equipments, and small arms, and were authorized to draw upon the treasurer for money. May 4th, A communication was read, signed by the regular physicians of the town, tendering gratuitously their professional services to
berry trees, and several elms on the terrace opposite attract attention by their size and appearance of vigor. The elms, remembered by a near-by resident as large trees in her girlhood, are at least seventy-five years old. Two Lombardy poplars of advanced age stand in the yard of a house on Main street, and peep over the top of the hill at the observer. Three large chestnut trees, a butternut, and half a dozen other mulberry trees formerly grew here. The mulberry trees were raised by William Woodbury, who imported the seed from Italy at the time of the craze for silk-worm culture. From 1836 to 1841 the state-paid a bounty on mulberry trees. Another mulberry tree of the same kind stands on Sycamore street close to the railroad bridge. A butternut grows in the yard of the house on the opposite side. A sapling, now grown to be a noble tree in its prime, was set out some time in the seventeen-seventies by John Tufts, when lie began to occupy the Tufts house on Sycamore street, soo
strict, 78, 92. Winter Hill Road, 21, 77. Winter Hill School, 16, 18, 19, 20, 47, 48, 50, 51, 52, 67, 69, 71. 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 81, 83, 92. Winthrop School, 81, 82, 94, 99. Woburn, Mass., 51, 78, 79. Woburn Road School, 48. Woodbury, Augusta F. 86. Woodbury, William, 87. Woodman, Edith A., 53. Woods, John M., 60. Worcester's Geography, 98. Worcester, George P., 76. Worcester's History, 98. Worcester's Second and Third Books of Reading, 98. Worcester's Third Woodbury, William, 87. Woodman, Edith A., 53. Woods, John M., 60. Worcester's Geography, 98. Worcester, George P., 76. Worcester's History, 98. Worcester's Second and Third Books of Reading, 98. Worcester's Third Book, 98. Wright, C., 14. W right, Elizur, 29-39. Wright, Ellen M., 29. Wyman, 22. Wyman, Edward, 72. Wyman, Lucy, 17. Wyman, Luke, 12, 46, 47, 48. Wyman, Miss, 73. Wyman, N., 14. Wyman, William, 14. Young Ladies' Class Book, 98. Young Reader, The, 98.