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ded soon rejoined the regiments and reported for duty. It was alleged at the time that the loss of this battle resulted from the neglect to order forward the pontoon train from Washington. This order was transmitted for Warrenton to Brigadier-General Woodbury, then in Washington, on the twelfth of November, and was promptly acted on by him. General Burnside had supposed that the pontoon train was then in Washington or Alexandria, while it was still on the Potomac, at Berlin and Harper's Ferral Burnside had only allowed time for transporting pontoons from Alexandria, when they had to be first transported to that place from Berlin. Delay was therefore entirely unavoidable, and, on investigation of the matter by General Burnside, General Woodbury was exonerated from all blame. General Hooker relieved General Burnside from his command on the twenty-fifth of January, but no advance movement was attempted till near the end of April, when a large cavalry force, under General Stoneman,
ity I hope never to witness again. On the second of December, we marched to our old quarters at this post, and thus ended our part of a fruitful campaign. My command took prisoners as follows, the evidence of which is herewith forwarded: List of names and rank taken by my provostmarshal, two hundred and forty-five; wounded on Mission Ridge and prisoners, twenty-one; voucher of Lieutenant Jaquis, Provost-Marshal of division, one hundred and eleven; with officers, four; vouchers of Captain Woodbury, of Twenty-ninth Ohio, one hundred and fifty-nine; vouchers of Captain Tolby, Twenty-seventh Missouri, thirty-seven; captured by Colonel Suman on Missionary Ridge, and turned over to the regiment on his right, as he states, which was one of General Wood's regiments, two hundred. Total, seven hundred and seventy-seven. The conduct of the officers and men of my command was highly commendable, and I thank them for a prompt obedience and execution of all orders, without regard to danger