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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for C. K. Woods or search for C. K. Woods in all documents.

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I am now at leisure to make an official record of the events with which the troops under my command have been connected during the eventful campaign which has just closed. During the month of September last, the Fifteenth army corps, which I had the honor to command, lay in camps along the. Big Black, about twenty miles east of Vicksburgh, Miss. It consisted of four divisions. The First, commanded by Brigadier-General B. J. Osterhaus, was composed of two brigades, led by Brigadier-General C. K. Woods and Colonel J. A. Williamson, of the Fourth Iowa. The Second, commanded by Brigadier-General Morgan L. Smith, was composed of two brigades, led by Generals Giles A. Smith and J. A. D. Lghtburn. The Third, commanded by Brigadier-General J. M. Tuttle, was composed of three brigades, led by Generals J. A. Momer and R. B. Buckland and Colonel J. J. Wood, of the Twelfth Iowa. The Fourth, commanded by Brigadier-General Hugh Ewing, was composed of three brigades, led by General J. M.
to the rear, soon saw the impracticability of the crossing, and desired to see me. On reporting to the general, he directed me to take the other four regiments not thus in position and proceed to the creek a mile above and to the right, where General Woods's brigade, of General Osterhaus's division, was constructing a pole-bridge, which was nearly completed. When I arrived at the crossing point, I met General Woods there. He had some skirmishers over the creek and a regiment ready to follow, General Woods there. He had some skirmishers over the creek and a regiment ready to follow, and as soon as that regiment passed over, the General kindly gave me the use of the bridge. I at once crossed over the four regiments, and prolonged the line of battle on his right. I formed in double lines, the Thirty-sixth Indiana and Fifty-ninth Illinois in front line, the right of my lines connecting with the left of the brigade of General Whittaker and of General Geary, still to my right, who had advanced from a crossing still farther to the right and higher up the creek. The line was t