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The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Generals Lee and long. (search)
with him as to make them feel in his death the loss of a dear friend. Third. That these resolutions be spread on our minutes and published, and that a copy be forwarded to the family of General Lee with the assurance of our deepest sympathies in their and our common bereavement. The committee who drafted the above resolutions were: Messrs. George L. Christian, chairman; Dabney H. Maury, William B. Taliaferro. To the memory of General long. At the same meeting, on motion of Mr. Micajah Woods, a committee of three was appointed to prepare resolutions to the memory of General A. L. Long, who reported the following: The undersigned committee, appointed to prepare resolutions to the memory of General Long, respectfully report as follows: Resolved, That in the death of Brigadier-General Armistead Lindsay Long, which occurred at his home in Charlottesville, Va., April 29, 1891, this Association lost one of its most distinguished and able members, and the South one of its m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
The Virginia veterans marched with nimble step to the martial strains of the renowned Stonewall Brigade Band, which was under the direction of Professor J. M. Brereton, formerly of this city. The musicians were clad in their beautiful new uniforms of blue and white, and never made a more pleasing appearance. Colonel Hugh R. Smith commanded the veterans of the Department of Virginia. He had as his chief of staff Captain Thomas Ellett, and his aides were General T. S. Garnett, General Micajah Woods, Charles G. Elliott, Joseph V. Bidgood, and Dr. R. G. Crouch. The First Brigade was under the charge of First Lieutenant Grand Commander C. W. Murdaugh, with Colonel John Murphy as aide. It comprised the following camps and bands: R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, E. Leslie Spence commanding; 250 men. The Social Home Band, of Richmond. Maury Camp, of Fredericksburg, T. F. Proctor commanding; thirty men. Stonewall Camp, Portsmouth, James Turner commanding; thirty-five men. Lee Ca
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of the history Committee of the Grand Camp C. V., Department of Virginia. (search)
ssion in which she was left by the results of the war, has accomplished what she has—(she has made greater material advances in proportion than any other section)— what could she not have done, if she had been the conqueror instead of the conquered? We simply allude to these material facts, with the hope that these, and every consideration dictated by self-respect, love of, and loyalty to, a sacred and glorious past, will prevent a repetition of the expressions of which we, as representatives of the Confederate cause and people, justly complain, and against which we earnestly protest. Committee on Publishing a School History for Use in Our Public and Private Schools. Geo. L. Christian, Acting Chairman, R. T. Barton, Rev. B. D. Tucker, R. S. B. Smith, John W. Fulton, Carter R. Bishop, John W. Daniel, T. H. Edwards, M. W. Hazelwood, R. A. Brock, James Mann, W. H. Hurkamp, Micajah woods, Thomas Ellett, Secretary. [From the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, January 20th, 19
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), North Carolina and Virginia. (search)
plan? If we wish the authors so dear to us, of whom we are so justly proud, to be loved in the future, or even known outside of a mere handful of dry and bloodless book-worms, we must to-day make them known to our children. All the criticisms so far made on the Stepping Stones to Literature are negative. We have pointed out things that are wanting. But there is one selection to which we will call special attention. It is, The battle hymn of the republic, by Julia Ward Howe, in the Sixth Reader, which represents the invading Northern army as the coming of the Lord in vengeance. Comment on such blasphemy is unnecessary. Surely no Southerner could have taken the trouble to advise himself of the existence of such an outrage on our children. George L. Christian, Chairman,< R. T. Barton, Carter R. Bishop, R. A. Brock, Rev. B. D. Tucker, John W. Daniel, James Mann, R. S. B. Smith, T. H. Edwards, W. H. Hurkamp, John W. Fulton, Micajah woods, Thomas Ellett, Secretary.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Virginia Battlefield Park. (search)
e Potomac; General Daniel E. Sickles; Governor W. A. Stone, of Pennsylvania, and ex-Governor Beaver, of that State; ex-Secretary of the Navy Tracy; General Felix Agnew, of the Baltimore American; General F. D. Grant, Charles Broadway Rouss, ex-Governor Chamberlain, of Maine; Congressman Amos Cummings, ex-Senator Faulkner, of West Virginia; Judge Walter James K. Jones, of Arkansas, General M. C. Butler, of South Carolina; General James Longstreet and Congressman Livingston, of Georgia; Chief Justice Woods, of Mississippi; ex-Senator Blackburn, of Kentucky; Senator Caffery, of Louisiana; Senator Bate and Congressman Richardson, of Tennessee; Congressman Lanham, and ex-Congressman Culberson, of Texas; besides very many more equally as prominent. All of these gentlemen not only consented to become members of the association, but are warmly in favor of the Fredericksburg park. III. Virginia has, through her Legislature, taken up the Fredericksburg Park proposition as a State matter.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
nt. I was aware that it had rendered valuable services in Southwest Virginia, of which I was anxious to make a record. But not being a Confederate organization no reports of its operations are to be found in the Official Records, and General Floyd's reports to the Governor were doubtless among the files of Adjutanteral Richardson's office, which was burned on the night of the evacuation of Richmond. It was, therefore, with great pleasure that we received last week a letter from Captain Micajah Woods, of Charlottesville, who was an officer in the State Line, and for a time an aid on the staff of General Floyd, in which he says: I hope during the coming spring to be able to send you a condensed history of the State Line, commanded by General John B. Floyd; in fact, I have several letters written to my parents giving quite a full account of all the history of this command. The services rendered by the State Line under Floyd seem to have been completely ignored in large measu
Merited compliment. Major Glass, of the Northwestern Army, in a letter to his paper, the Lynchburg Republican, pays the following tribute to one of the most promising young gentlemen of our army, and son of Dr. Woods, of Albemarle, who, though not arrived at the fighting age of eighteen, has been doing gallant service as an aid of Gen. Floyd: "Our young friend Capt. Micajah Woods, of Albemarle, one of our aids, left us this morning for home, to enter upon a course of studies at the of the most promising young gentlemen of our army, and son of Dr. Woods, of Albemarle, who, though not arrived at the fighting age of eighteen, has been doing gallant service as an aid of Gen. Floyd: "Our young friend Capt. Micajah Woods, of Albemarle, one of our aids, left us this morning for home, to enter upon a course of studies at the University of Virginia. He was my messmate, and is the best and most intelligent young man of my acquaintance. We shall all miss him greatly."