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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 32 4 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 26 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 11 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 15, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 5 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Charles R. Woods or search for Charles R. Woods in all documents.

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g foes could carry them off to Atlanta. This was the group. I had never till then seen Sherman with such a look on his face. His eyes flashed. He did not speak. He only watched the front. There appeared not only in his face, but in his whole pose, a concentrated fierceness. Schofield had located several batteries in an excellent position to pour spherical case and canister shot into the broken interval. All this was being carefully and rapidly done. At the same time the grand Charles R. Woods, whose division was next to Schofield, was quietly forming his brigades at right angles to and in rear of our line. Logan was also bringing some of Harrow's division to bear from beyond them, and moving up August Mersy's brigade from Dodge to replace Martin's, whose early call and march to help the leftmost battle had weakened Lightburn's front. The cannon were making much disturbance. The smoke was often blinding and the roar deafening; such firing kept back the remainder of Chea
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 36: Battle of Ezra Church (search)
h. Logan, deploying everything except a reasonable reserve, pushed slowly southward. One of his divisions, that of Charles R. Woods, occupied the space from Blair to and including the church. The other two, Harrow's and Morgan L. Smith's, pretty the conformation of the ground, Logan's two divisions, Harrow's and Morgan L. Smith's, which were formed on the right of Woods's division, made nearly a right angle with the rest of the line. We had no time to locate our batteries in front withouthere were too thick for anything except blind action in the use of artillery on either side. Blair and Dodge, and Charles R. Woods, from their first approaches, had strong skirmishing; then encountered brisk firing, particularly from artillery witccess. His decision and resolution everywhere animated and encouraged his officers and men. The division commanders, Generals Woods, M. L. Smith, and Harrow showed gallant conduct and well-timed skill; they repelled many terrible and persistent atta
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 39: General Hood's northward march; Sherman in pursuit; battle of Allatoona (search)
t a few miles from us. The next morning at dawn there were no signs of the Confederate army in our neighborhood, except those of vacant camps. We proceeded as rapidly as we could as far as the town of Gaylesville, Ala. There we halted October 21st. Hood's whole army had by this time passed on. His own headquarters were then at Gadsden. The only skirmish in consequence of our pursuit that any part of my force had was on the morning of October 16th, when my leftmost division, under General Charles R. Woods, ran upon Hood's rear guard at Ship's Gap. We there captured a part of the Twenty-fourth South Carolina. From that time on the Confederates were moving rapidly away from us. From the 21st to the 28th of October we remained at Gaylesville or in that vicinity, while Sherman was communicating with his commanders at Chattanooga and Nashville, and with his commander in chief at Washington concerning the future. One of my corps officers, General Ransom, who was admirably commanding
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 40: return to Atlanta; the March to the sea; Battle of Griswoldville, ga. (search)
ilroad early November 22d. Then, turning back a little from East Macon, I had him send General Charles R. Woods to watch out that way with his division and help Kilpatrick, for much Confederate forceattack something. They might, at least, catch our long, snaky trains and cut them asunder. General Woods faced back, and took up a strong position near a church; then he sent forward one brigade unagement the enemy made three separate charges and were as often repulsed with heavy loss. General Woods foots his losses: 13 killed, 79 wounded, and 2 missing; total, 93. The enemy's loss was anth Corps. General: I take pleasure in congratulating the brigade of General Walcutt of General Woods's division of the fifteenth Corps on its complete success in the action of yesterday. Officwold Station to the sea without loss of life. The object I had in sending, through Osterhaus, Woods's division off to my right was to help Kilpatrick keep back any forces of the Confederate cavalr
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 44: skirmishing at Cheraw and Fayetteville and the Battle of Averysboro (search)
on as fit subjects for imprisonment or exchange. This sensible disposition of them was made. There were two sources of chagrin which annoyed me at Cheraw: one was that a detachment which I sent to Florence had not been sufficiently vigorous in its reconnoissance. The officers conducting it, however, discovered a force of Confederate cavalry, and trains of cars loaded with troops, and brought back 20 or 30 prisoners. The second chagrin was from an accident like that at Columbia. Charles R. Woods's division of infantry was massed near the river waiting their turn to cross, when a terrific explosion occurred. It was occasioned by our working parties having thrown together on the river slope masses of artillery shells, with considerable powder. The object had been to drown the powder in the river, and also to sink the shells in the water to render them useless. By carelessness considerable powder had been strewn along the ground. The teams passing over the bridge road had in s
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 45: March through the Carolinas; the Battle of Bentonville; Johnston's surrender (search)
Leading my force, I approached Bentonville, threw a brigade and battery toward Cox's bridge to save it, and kept back any enemy coming from that quarter. The bridge was burned upon our approach. We had similar experience to Slocum with detachments of the Confederate cavalry becoming more and more stubborn as we advanced. A little nearer the village we struck a crossroad where there was a Confederate outpost held by infantry in the edge of a wood. This caused the deployment of a part of Woods's division, which was on the lead. The point was soon cleared, though a strong Confederate skirmish line well reinforced kept us and Slocum (or I should say Hazen) back; that was Hazen's position after Slocum had closed up upon Johnston's new works. The Confederate resistance was so great that it took me until three o'clock in the afternoon to make close connections. During the remainder of the day some artillery firing occurred and continuous skirmishing, but there was no real battle whi
. Willich, August, 1, 518. Wilson, Henry, I, 175, 446; II, 198, 322, 323, 353, 354, 386, 395, 397. Wilson, James H., II, 158. Wisser, John P., II, 539, 543. Wood, Fernando, II, 436, 437, 442. Wood, H. Clay, II, 463. Wood, James, I, 615. Wood, T. J., I, 478, 479, 500, 504, 511, 513, 514, 521, 537, 551-555, 568, 569, 582, 591, 604, 606-609; II, 288, 301, 340. Woodbury, Daniel P., I, 319, 323. Woodford, Stewart L., I, 126; 11, 587. Woodman, E. W., II, 45. Woods, Charles R., II, 13, 14, 19, 21, 24, 66, 70, 72-74, 122, 135, 148. Woods, George W., 1, 25, 27. Woods, Leonard, I, 31, 32, 42. Wool, John E., II, 175. Woolworth, Jeanie, II, 493. Woolworth, J. M., II, 493. Wotherspoon, Wm. W., II, 565. Wright, A. R., I, 361, 369. Wright, James 8., 111, 81. Wright, R. R., II, 414. Wright, W. W., I, 524. Yarmouth Academy, I, 17, 24, 25. Yorke, L. E., II, 125. Yorktown, Siege of, I, 210. Young, B. F., II, 587. Young, D., II,