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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 10 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Robert W. Woolley or search for Robert W. Woolley in all documents.

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. resolve to retreat. Munford's account. John C. Brown. preparations for retreat. protests of the Kentuckians. Colonel Woolley's account of General Johnston's work at Bowling Green. evacuation of Bowling Green. the March. Kentucky brigade. nelson and Henry were nearly twice as far from Bowling Green by land as from the Federal strongholds by water. Colonel Robert W. Woolley, in a letter written at the time, says: The railroad was almost bare of transportation. The locomotives cellent man lived long enough to assure General Johnston of his approval of the strategy he then condemned. Colonel Robert W. Woolley (now of Louisville, Kentucky), who had enjoyed exceptional advantages of observation, in a communication to theohnston left Bowling Green before daylight on the 13th, and made his headquarters at Edgefield, opposite Nashville. Colonel Woolley, in the article before mentioned, says: The evacuation was accomplished, protected by a force so small as to m
been suggested, in a popular revolution, based on the idea of State-rights or decentralization, the War Department was greatly hampered in its designs by local public opinion operating both through the State Executives and through Congress. Colonel Woolley, in the letter already quoted, says truly and forcibly: But who is to be blamed? Tile answer is given by every flash of lightning that comes from the coast. I shall not be believed if I state the number of letters General Johnston wrar clamor, pursue your course and follow the dictates of your own reason, and fame will be your reward. Love and others also wrote to him in the same spirit. Quotations have already been made from an able article from the incisive pen of Woolley; other Kentuckians took the same view; but one of the most gratifying testimonials was a letter, quoted hereafter, from the provisional Governor, George W. Johnson, which might properly be added as a companion-piece to his energetic protest agai