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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whittier, John Greenleaf 1807-1892 (search)
en over him, until Not Maia's son, with wings for ears, Such plumes about his visage wears, Nor Milton's six-winged angel gathers Such superfluity of feathers ; and, I confess, I was quite unwilling to undergo a martyrdom which my best friends could scarcely refrain from laughing at. But a summons like that of Garrison's bugle-blast could scarcely be unheeded by one who, from birth and education, held fast the traditions of that earlier abolitionism which, under the lead of Benezet and Woolman, had effaced from the Society of Friends every vestige of slave-holding. I had thrown myself, with a young man's fervid enthusiasm, into a movement which commended itself to my reason and conscience, to my love of country and my sense of duty to God and my fellow-men. My first venture in authorship was the publication at my own expense, in the spring of 1833, of a pamphlet entitled Justice and expediency, on the moral and political evils of slavery and the duty of emancipation. Under suc
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 4: the hour and the man. (search)
freedom of the slave before Garrison had thought upon the subject at all. Washington and Jefferson, Franklin, Jay, and Hamilton had been Abolitionists before he was born, but theirs was a divided interest. The establishment of a more perfect union was the paramount object of their lives. John Wesley had denounced slavery in language quite as harsh as Garrison's, but his, too, was a divided interest, the religious revival of the eighteenth century being his distinctive mission. Benezet, Woolman, and Lundy were saints, who had yearned with unspeakable sympathy for the black bondmen, and were indefatigable in good works in his behalf, but they had not that stern and iron quality without which reforms cannot be launched upon the attention of mankind. What his predecessors lacked, Garrison possessed to a marvelous degree — the undivided interest, the supremacy of a single purpose, the stern stuff out of which the moral reformer is made, and in which he is panoplied. They were all hi
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 9: agitation and repression. (search)
ing him to spread the news among the Abolitionists of his neighborhood and to secure the election of a goodly number of delegates by the society in Rhode Island. He forthwith bethought him of Whittier on his farm in Haverhill, and enjoined his old friend to fail not to appear in Philadelphia. But while the young poet longed to go to urge upon his Quaker brethren of that city to make their solemn testimony against slavery visible over the whole land — to urge them, by the holy memories of Woolman and Benezet and Tyson to come up as of old to the standard of Divine Truth, though even the fires of another persecution should blaze around them, he feared that he would not be able to do so. The spirit was surely willing but the purse was empty, as thee know, he quaintly adds, our farming business does not put much cash in our pockets. The cash he needed was generously supplied by Samuel E. Sewall, and Whittier went as a delegate to the convention after all. The disposition on the part o
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
to be so understood. We are not, nor ever have been, connected with the antislavery societies, and, although among those associated with them are many estimable individuals, and not a few of them in the list of our particular friends, yet we have uniformly believed, that one of the greatest mistakes committed by the antislavery people is the mixing up with the abolition question the warfare against what they are pleased to call prejudices in regard to the colored race. Spirits of Fox, Woolman and Benezet! Here we have the full manifestation of that hateful spirit which hunts the colored man with blood-hound ferocity on these shores, and makes his life full of wretchedness and misery. Such Quakerism as this is of Satan's own manufacture. I shall wait with some curiosity to see how it will be treated by the Society of Friends in England. I hope you will lay it before them, that we may have a response in due season. William Bassett has been cut off from the Society in this c
arly repugnance to female petitions to Congress, 1.157. Woodbury, James Trask, Rev. [b. Francestown, N. H., May 9, 1803; d. Milford, Mass., Jan. 16, 1861], one of 70 agents, 2.167; abuse of G., 2.141-143, 152, 167, 271, replied to, 154; sympathy from E. Wright, 168; accuses G. of Thomsonianism, 281. Brother of Woodbury, Levi [1789-18511, identity mistaken, 1.517; Secretary of Treasury, 2.141. Woolfolk, Austin, assaults Lundy, 1.91, 50, defied by G., 151, avoids him in jail, 177. Woolman, John [1720-1773), anti-slavery, 1.393, 2.413. Worcester (Mass.) A. S. Convention, 2.163, 167, 170; clerical, 244, Young Men's, 245, for G. and Rogers, 414, 417, 418, 420. World, edited by C. W. Denison, 1.415. World's Anti-Slavery Convention (London), call, 2.352, modified, 353; Am. delegates, 351, 353, 354, 356; meets, 362, 367; debate on woman question, 367-373; tries to get G. to enter, 374, 375; results of convention, 380, woman's rights landmark, 381, 382. World's Anti-Sla
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 16 (search)
I think, with Guizot, that it is a gross delusion to believe in the sovereign power of political machinery. To hear some men talk of the government, you would suppose that Congress was the law of gravitation, and kept the planets in their places. Mr. Webster sneered at the antislavery and kindred movements as rub-a-dub agitations. Judge Story plumes himself on our government abolishing the slave-trade in 1808, as if in that it was not the servant of Clarkson and Wilberforce, Benezet and Woolman! I never take up a paper full of Congress squabbles, reported as if sunrise depended upon them, without thinking of that idle English nobleman at Florence, whose brother, just arrived from London, happening to mention the House of Commons, he languidly asked, Ah I is that thing going still? [Great merriment.] Did you ever see on Broadway — you may in Naples — a black figure grinding chocolate in the windows? He seems to turn the wheel, but in truth the wheel turns him. [Laughter.] Now
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
. Lloyd Garrison. In another direction he sped the call to Whittier, on his farm at Haverhill, who answered doubtfully, but eagerly, November 11: John G. Whittier to W. L. Garrison. Thy letter of the 5th has been received. . . . Ms. I long to go to Philadelphia, to urge upon the members of my Religious Society the duty of putting their shoulders to the work—to make their solemn testimony against Slavery visible over the whole land—to urge them, by the holy memories of Woolman and Benezet and Tyson, to come up as of old to the standard of Divine Truth, though even the fires of another persecution should blaze around them. But the expenses of the journey will, I fear, be too much for me: as thee know, our farming business does not put much cash in our pockets. I am, however, greatly obliged to the Boston Y. M. Association for selecting me as one of their delegates. I do not know how it may be,—but whether I go or not, my best wishes and my warmest sympathies a<
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Anti-Slavery Poems (search)
ook forth From their fair dwellings, to the things of earth, Is it a dream, that with their eyes of love, They gaze now on us from the bowers above? Lay's ardent soul, and Benezet the mild, Steadfast in faith, yet gentle as a child, Meek-hearted Woolman, and that brother-band, The sorrowing exiles from their ‘Father land,’ Leaving their homes in Krieshiem's bowers of vine, And the blue beauty of their glorious Rhine, To seek amidst our solemn depths of wood Freedom from man, and holy peace witsmen like those who sought the primal fount Of righteous law, the Sermon on the Mount; Lawyers who prize, like Quincy, (to our day Still spared, Heaven bless him!) honor more than pay, And Christian jurists, starry-pure, like Jay; Preachers like Woolman, or like them who bore The faith of Wesley to our Western shore, And held no convert genuine till he broke Alike his servants' and the Devil's yoke; And priests like him who Newport's market trod, And o'er its slave-ships shook the bolts of God!
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Old portraits and modern Sketches (search)
scholar may well admire the power of certain portions of George Fox's Journal, where a strong spirit clothes its utterance in simple, downright Saxon words; the quiet and beautiful enthusiasm of Pennington; the torrent energy of Edward Burrough; the serene wisdom of Penn; the logical acuteness of Barclay; the honest truthfulness of Sewell; the wit and humor of John Roberts, (for even Quakerism had its apostolic jokers and drab-coated Robert Halls;) and last, not least, the simple beauty of Woolman's Journal, the modest record of a life of good works and love. Let us look at the Life of Thomas Ellwood. The book before us is a hardly used Philadelphia reprint, bearing date of 1775. The original was published some sixty years before. It is not a book to be found in fashionable libraries, or noticed in fashionable reviews, but is none the less deserving of attention. Ellwood was born in 1639, in the little town of Crowell, in Oxfordshire. Old Walter, his father, was of gen
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Sketches and tributes (search)
the old religions of the world the germs of a purer faith and a holier hope. She loved to listen, as in St. Pierre's symposium of The Coffee-House of Surat, to the confessions of faith of all sects and schools of philosophy, Christian and pagan, and gather from them the consoling truth that our Father has nowhere left his children without some witness of Himself. She loved the old mystics, and lingered with curious interest and sympathy over the writings of Bohme, Swedenborg, Molinos, and Woolman. Yet this marked speculative tendency seemed not in the slightest degree to affect her practical activities. Her mysticism and realism ran in close parallel lines without interfering with each other. With strong rationalistic tendencies from education and conviction, she found herself in spiritual accord with the pious introversion of Thomas a Kempis and Madame Guion. She was fond of Christmas Eve stories, of warnings, signs, and spiritual intimations, her half belief in which sometime
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