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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 88 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 10 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 4 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for John Woolman or search for John Woolman in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 3 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: philosophers and divines, 1720-1789 (search)
sworth. Jonathan Mayhew. Samuel Johnson. John Woolman An old-time classification of the human e befell the last of our colonial thinkers, John Woolman (1720-1772), the Quaker, a sort of provincilife. The contrast is like that portrayed by Woolman himself when he said that while many parts ofn remains quiet, and our land fruitful. In Woolman, then, we have the fruits of quietism as conttures. The first of those creatures for whom Woolman was concerned was a slave. Here there arose was much afflicted in mind. As was his wont, Woolman now began to gather reasons for his feeling o, presented with a kindly shrewdness, many of Woolman's slave-owning hearers looked serious. It wathis newly settled land of America, now drove Woolman to publish, and at his own expense, Some consnot criticism, but compassion, that furnishes Woolman with his strongest lever against that great bp. 317. In the light of such disclosures, Woolman might have attacked the accursed institution [3 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
the Rocky Mountains, in Evangeline. In Bryant, the allusion to the continuous woods Where rolls the Oregon has been traced to Carver. Thanatopsis, the lines To a waterfowl, and The Prairies alike reveal the spirit of inland discovery. The relation of English poets to American observers is most significant of all. Coleridge praises Cartwright, Heame, and Bartram; the impression which Bartram had left on his mind, says his grandson, was deep and lasting. Lamb is enamoured of pious John Woolman, and eventually favours Crevecoeur, yielding to Hazlitt's recommendation. Southey commends Dwight, and employs Bartram in Madoc. In Mazeppa, Byron, an inveterate reader of travels, takes the notion of an audible aurora borealis from Heame. But the most striking instance is Wordsworth. Commonly supposed to have refrained from describing what he had not seen with the bodily eye, and to have read little save his own poetry, he was in fact a systematic student in the field of travel and o
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Samuel (1696-1772), 81-86 Jonathan in England, 228 Jonathan Oldstyle, 233 Jones, Joseph S., 224 n., 228 Jonson, Ben, 150-151 Joseph Dennie and his circle, 233 n. Journal (N. Y.), 149 Journal (Patrick Gass), 205 Journal (Woolman), 86, 87 n., 88 n. Journal kept by John Bartram of Journal of the Continental Congress, 144 Journal of the Federal Convention, 146 Journal of the taking of Cape Breton, a, 9 Journals (Emerson), 351, 355, 357 Judah, S. B., 231 nce of Zion's Saviour in New England, 23 Wood, W. B., 221, 223 n. Woodbridge, Rev., John, 154 Woodbridge, T., 55 Woodcraft, 315 Woodman, Spare that Tree, 279 Woods, William, 151 Woodworth, Samuel, 227, 227 n., 231, 279, 292 Woolman, John, 86-89, 212 Wollstonecraft, Mary, 288, 331 Woman in the nineteenth century, 343 Word of Congress, 174 Wordsworth, 183, 188, 194, 197, 212, 213,240, 262, 263, 264, 267, 268, 279, 332, 337 Works (Poe), 230 n. Works in prose and