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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 65 11 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 39 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 21 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for John L. Worden or search for John L. Worden in all documents.

Your search returned 38 results in 7 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
under the orders of this department. You will immediately, on the first favorable opportunity after the receipt of this order, afford every facility to Capt. Vodges by boats and other means to enable him to land the troops under his command, it being the wish and intention of the Navy Department to co-operate with the War Department in that object. I am, respectfully yours, Gideon Welles. Secretary of the Navy. These orders were sent to Capt. Adams by a special messenger (Lieut. John L. Worden), who crossed the rebellious States to deliver them. He committed the orders to memory, in case the papers should be lost or he be arrested, but he arrived in safety, and delivered the document to Capt. Adams on the 12th of April. Capt. Vodges' company was immediately landed at Fort Pickens. Thus from the time Capt. Vodges arrived and was placed on board the Brooklyn, and from the time of General Scott's orders to land the troops, dated March 12, 1861, twenty-four days elapsed be
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. (search)
the morning. The plan of battle was for the naval force to lead up to the attack, and engage the batteries at Pork and Sandy Points and the Confederate vessels. While this was going on the Army was to advance and land under cover of the naval fire. A naval brigade of artillery was also detailed to land from six launches, at Ashby Harbor, or, if possible, at Sandy Point, half a mile above. The naval division under Com. Rowan was arranged in three columns, commanded respectively by Lieuts. Worden, Murray and Davenport, these to be followed by the Army transports, also in divisions. Two days were occupied by our fleet in threading its way through the intricate channels of the marshes, owing to fogs and foul weather. These channels were so narrow that only two vessels could proceed abreast, and in this order they continued until reaching the wider and deeper waters of Croatan Sound. The naval division, composed and commanded as stated above, was accompanied, as predetermined
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 12: fight between the Merrimac and Monitor, March 8, 1862. (search)
When the vessel was launched and equipped, Lieut. Worden started at once for Hampton Roads, withoutish what her inventor claimed for her. In fact Worden was somewhat doubtful whether he should ever as little Monitor, under the command of Lieut. John L. Worden, arrived from New York, after experienof the result of the coming conflict. Lieutenant Worden was ordered to proceed at two o'clock A.e time the Monitor was signalled to attack. Worden showed his confidence in the Monitor and her eter could use but a small proportion of them. Worden's plan was to keep near to his enemy and endeaerrimac, but previous to leaving New York, Lieut. Worden received orders from the Bureau of Ordnancs as much as the eleven-inch guns would bear. Worden felt obliged to conform to these instructions,same place would have made an opening, and had Worden known this at the time. he would doubtless haontinued the action until 11:30 A. M., when Capt. Worden was injured. Capt. Worden then sent for me[9 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
the Monitor in hull or turret. To determine this point. Commander John L. Worden was sent down to Ossabaw Sound to operate up the Great Ogesuccessful in taking the fort and destroying the Nashville. Commander Worden arrived off the bar at Ossabaw Sound on January 24th, 1863, bu morning. When just outside of the range of Fort McAllister's guns Worden again anchored, and was there joined by the gun-boats Seneca, Wissaoes that he might find in the way. At 7 A. M., on the 27th, Commander Worden got underway with the Montauk (the gun-boats following), movednot seem to have the same effect upon the enemy as the shells, Commander Worden, considering that he was throwing away ammunition, got underwaart of the vessel, the Montauk was struck; but we presume that Commander Worden was satisfied with the result of his experiment, and so reported to Rear-Admiral Dupont. Worden, whose experience in the lighter Monitor at Hampton Roads ought to have made him a good judge of the stre
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
the gunboat Isaac Smith. the iron-clad Montauk, Commander John L. Worden, engages the forts at Ogeechee River. Confederat prudence. On the 1st of February the Montauk, Commander John L. Worden, was ordered to engage the forts at Ogeechee Riven a considerable victory. On the 27th of February, Commander Worden, on making a reconnaissance, observed that the Nashviel Ammen. Montauk Seneca and Dawn moved up the river. Worden was able to approach within twelve hundred yards of the Na enfiladed the fort at long range. In a short time Commander Worden had the satisfaction of seeing the Nashville in flame of the enemy's guns, but did no harm, and that night Commander Worden had the satisfaction of reporting to Rear-Admiral Dup2. Passaic Captain Percival Drayton. 3. Montauk Captain John L. Worden. 4. Patapsco Commander Daniel Ammen. 5. New e Navy Register. Iron-clad steamer Montauk. Commander, John L. Worden; Lieutenant-Commander, C. H. Cushman; Assistant S
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
C. S. Perley; Acting-Masters, Charles Cortney, Jacob Kimball and J. B. Wood, Jr.; Acting-Engineers, Edward Scattergood, Wm. H. Kilpatrick, L. H. Harvey and R. L. Webb; Acting-Master's Mates, J. Creighton and E. W. Flowers. Steamer Morse. Acting-Masters, Peter Hayes and G. W. Caswell; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Henry Russell, Acting-Assistant Engineers, Thomas Divine, Tim. Flanders and George West; Acting-Master's Mates, William Dunne and C. E. Rich. Iron-clad Monitor. Commanders, John L. Worden, Wm. N. Jeffers and T. H. Stevens [commanding at different times]; Lieutenant, S. Dana Greene; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Wm. Flye; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, D. C. Logue; Acting-Asssistant Paymaster, W. F. Keeler; Acting-Master, L. M. Stodder; Assistant Engineers, A. B. Campbell, Geo. H. White, R. W. Hands and M. T. Sunstrom; Acting-Master's Mates, (Geo. Frederickson and Peter Williams. Steamer Jacob Bell. Lieutenant--Commander, E. P. McCrea; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, O. J.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
Lisbon, was sent to Boston and condemned by the Admiralty Court, her alleged owner never receiving a penny of the £ 15,000 he had paid into the Confederate treasury as the price of the vessel. The fate of the Nashville has already been mentioned. In January and February, 1863, several attempts were made to destroy her as she lay above Fort McAllister, on the Great Ogeechee River. On the 27th of February, 1863, she was set on fire and blown up by shells from the Monitor Montauk, Commander John L. Worden. The Shenandoah, originally called the Sea King, was the last and the most dangerous of all the Confederate cruisers. She was a full-rigged ship of about eight hundred tons, with so-called auxiliary steam power, and very fast under either sail or steam, capable of making three hundred and twenty miles in twenty-four hours under favorable circumstances, which exceeded the speed of any vessel in the U. S. Navy. On the 8th of October, 1864, the Sea King cleared from London for B