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James Russell Lowell, Among my books 182 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 50 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 30 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for William Wordsworth or search for William Wordsworth in all documents.

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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Anti-Slavery Poems (search)
born In servitude, and nursed in scorn, Casting aside the weary weight And fetters of its low estate, In that strong majesty of soul Which knows no color, tongue, or clime, Which still hath spurned the base control Of tyrants through all time! Far other hands than mine may wreathe The laurel round thy brow of death, And speak thy praise, as one whose word A thousand fiery spirits stirred, Who crushed his foeman as a worm, The reader may, perhaps, call to mind the beautiful sonnet of William Wordsworth, addressed to Toussaint L'Ouverture, during his confinement in France. “Toussaint!—thou most unhappy man of men! Whether the whistling rustic tends his plough Within thy hearing, or thou liest now Buried in some deep dungeon's earless den; O miserable chieftain—where and when Wilt thou find patience?—Yet, die not, do thou Wear rather in thy bonds a cheerful brow; Though fallen thyself, never to rise again, Live and take comfort. Thou hast left behind Powers that will work for thee;
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Notes (search)
Notes Note 1, page 18. The reader may, perhaps, call to mind the beautiful sonnet of William Wordsworth, addressed to Toussaint L'Ouverture, during his confinement in France. “Toussaint!—thou most unhappy man of men! Whether the whistling rustic tends his plough Within thy hearing, or thou liest now Buried in some deep dungeon's earless den; O miserable chieftain—where and when Wilt thou find patience?—Yet, die not, do thou Wear rather in thy bonds a cheerful brow; Though fallen thyself, never to rise again, Live and take comfort. Thou hast left behind Powers that will work for thee; air, earth, and skies,— There's not a breathing of the common wind That will forget thee; thou hast great allies. Thy friends are exultations, agonies, And love, and man's unconquerable mind.” Note 2, page 67. The Northern author of the Congressional rule against receiving petitions of the people on the subject of Slavery. Note 3, page 88. There was at the time when this poem was writt