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James Russell Lowell, Among my books 182 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 50 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 30 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. You can also browse the collection for William Wordsworth or search for William Wordsworth in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 1: Longfellow as a classic (search)
diminished. Such reactions have notably occurred, for instance, in the cases of Scott, Byron, Wordsworth, and even of Burns, yet without visible or permanent results, while the weaker fame of Southeyrally by Scottish artists. Of these selections, six are taken from Longfellow, five each from Wordsworth and Thomson, and three each from Shakespeare, Burns, and Moore. Of other American poets Bryanelected for the use of parochial schools and libraries. To this the leading contributors are Wordsworth (twenty-one), Longfellow (eighteen), Cowper (eleven), and Tennyson (nine), the whole number ofthe supposition that the domestic and law-abiding gifts were far from them. The prominence of Wordsworth was developed in spite of this tradition, and even when the report cheered some of his would-bn intoxicated at the university, it was damped by the opinion expressed by Theodore Hook that Wordsworth's conceptions of inebriation were no doubt extremely limited. The popular impression in such
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 2: birth, childhood, and youth (search)
Chapter 2: birth, childhood, and youth Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was born in Portland, Maine, February 27, 1807, being the son of Stephen and Zilpah (Wadsworth) Longfellow, both his parents having been descended from Yorkshire families which had migrated in the seventeenth century. The name of Longfellow first appears in English records as Langfellay, while the name of Wadsworth sometimes appears as Wordsworth, suggesting a possible connection with another poet. His father, Stephen Longfellow, was a graduate of Harvard College in 1794, being a classmate of the Rev. Dr. W. E. Channing and the Hon. Joseph Story. He became afterward a prominent lawyer in Portland. He was also at different times a member of the Massachusetts Legislature, Maine being then a part of that State; a member of the celebrated Hartford Convention of Federalists; a presidential elector, and a member of Congress. In earlier generations the poet's grandfather was a judge of the Court of Common Pleas; his
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 7: the corner stone laid (search)
s to these particulars would give a new and delightful expression to the face of our poetry. But the difficulty is, that instead of coming forward as bold, original thinkers, they have imbibed the degenerate spirit of modern English poetry. North American Review, XXXIV. 74,75. What is meant by this last passage is seen when he goes on to point out that each little village then had its little Byron, its self-tormenting scoffer at morality, its gloomy misanthropist in song, and that even Wordsworth, in some respects an antidote to Byron, was as yet a very unsafe model for imitation; and he farther points out how invariably those who have imitated him have fallen into tedious mannerisms. He ends with a moral, perhaps rather tamely stated: We hope, however, that ere long some one of our most gifted bards will throw his fetters off, and relying on himself alone, fathom the recesses of his own mind, and bring up rich pearls from the secret depths of thought. lb. 78. The true glory
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Index (search)
., Barrett, 142; his Literary History of America, cited, 142 note. Wesselhoeft, Dr., Robert, 161. West Point, N. Y., 18. Westminster Abbey, service of commemoration for Longfellow at, 248-257. Weston, Miss Anne W., 167. Weston Mss., cited, 167 note. White Mountains, 51, 132. Whitman, Walt, 6, 10, 276. Whittier, John Greenleaf, 1, 6, 68, 134, 168, 258, 265, 267, 285, 294; thanks Longfellow for his antislavery poems, 167; his literary position, 259; relations with Longfellow, 271. Wijk, Mr., 101-103. Wijk, Mrs., 102, 103. Wilcox, Carlos, 145. Wilde, Oscar, 292. Wilkins, Mary, 198. Willis, Nathaniel P., 8, 19, 89, 90, 247. Windsor Castle, 221. Winter, William, on Longfellow's unpublished poems, 276. Winthrop, R. C., 222. Wiseman, Cardinal, on Longfellow, 281. Worcester, Joseph E., 121. Worcester, Noah, 63, 64. Worcester, Mass., 118 note. Wordsworth, William, 7-10, 80, 266. York Cathedral, 224. Yorkshire County, Eng., 11. Zedlitz, Joseph C., 161.