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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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incum sojers come. De massa run, ha, ha! De darkey stay, ho, ho! It mus' be now de kingdum comina, Ana de yar ob jubilo. De oberseer he makes us trubble, Ana he dribe us rouna a spell, We lock him up in de smoke-house cellar, Wid de key flung in de well. De whip am lost, de hana — cuff broke, But de massy hab his pay; He big ana ole enough for to know better Dan to went ana run away. De massa run, ha, ha! De darkey stay, ho, ho! It mus' be now de kingdum comina, Ana de yar ob jubilo. Henry Clay Work. Negro teamsters near Butler's signal tower, Bermuda hundred, 1864 The history and nature of contraband of war, so expressively illustrated by this photograph, are thus explained by George Haven Putnam: Early in the war, General Benjamin F. Butler invented the term contraband, which came to be accepted as the most convenient classification for the colored refugee who had made his way within the Federal lines and who, while no longer a slave or a piece of property, was not yet acce
houting the battlecry of freedom. And we'll fill the vacant ranks with a million freemen more, Shouting the battlecry of freedom. Marching through Georgia Henry Clay Work Written in honor of Sherman's famous march from Atlanta to the sea. Bring the good old bugle, boys, we'll sing another song— Sing it with a spirit that y to Jeff Davis true, Beauregard and Johnston, too, Magruder, Price, and General Bragg, And give three cheers for the Southern flag. Sleeping for the flag Henry Clay Work Henry C. Work's songs shared popularity during the war with the melodies of Stephen foster. sleeping for the flag, Kingdom coming, brave boys are they,Henry C. Work's songs shared popularity during the war with the melodies of Stephen foster. sleeping for the flag, Kingdom coming, brave boys are they, and marching through Georgia were sung to glory in the 1860's. When the boys come home in triumph, brother, With the laurels they shall gain; When we go to give them welcome, brother, We shall look for you in vain. We shall wait for your returning, brother, You were set forever free; For your comrades left you sleeping, brother, U
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Songs of the Civil War, popular (search)
s who left us their glory. Battle hymn of the republic Julia Ward Howe. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord. The Blue and the Gray. Francis M. Finch. By the flow of the inland river. Brave boys are they. Henry C. Work. Brave boys are they, gone at their country's call. Dixie (Southern). Albert Pike. Southrons hear your country call you. Dixie (Northern). T. M. Cooley. Away down South where grows the cotton. John Brown's body John Brown's body lies a-mould ring in the grave. Just before the battle, mother. Geo. F. Root. Just before the battle, mother, I am thinking most of you. Marching through Georgia. Henry C. Work. Bring the good old bugle, boys; we'll sing another song. Maryland, my Maryland (Southern). Jos. R. Randall. The despot's heel is on thy shore, Maryland. O wrap the flag around me, boys. R. Stewart Taylor. Tramp, tramp, tramp. Geo. F. Root. In the prison cell I sit. When Johnny comes
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Work, Henry Clay 1832-1884 (search)
Work, Henry Clay 1832-1884 Song writer; born in Middletown, Conn., Oct. 1, 1832; received a common school education; and was apprenticed to a printer. While working at his trade he studied harmony, and when the Civil War broke out he began to write songs, the most famous ones being Nicodemus the slave, and Marching through Georgia. Besides writing songs and the music for them, he invented and patented a knitting machine, a walking doll, and a rotary engine. He died in Hartford, Conn., June 8, 1884.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
p, John, 110 Winthrop, Theodore, 280 Wirt, William, 104, 105 Wise, Henry Augustus, 154 Wister, Owen, 293, 363 With My friends, 388 Without and within, 242 Wives of the dead, the, 23 Wolfe, Gen., 11 Wonder books, 21, 401 Wonderful One-Hoss Shay, The, 237 Wondersmith, the, 373, 374 Wood, Mrs., John, 291 Woodhouse, Lord, 141 Woodrow, James, 333, 341 Woods, Leonard, 208 Woolsey, Sarah, 402 Woolson, Constance Fenimore, 381-382 Wordsworth, 13, 38, 248 Work, Henry Clay, 284, 285 Work and play, 213 Working with hands, 324 Works of Benjamin Franklin, the, 117 Works of Poe, 61 n., 65 n. Wound-Dresser, The, 270, 270 n. Wreck of the Hesperus, the, 36 X-ing a Paragrab, 67 Yale, 153, 198, 200, 203, 206, 207, 211 213, 219 Yale review, the, 263 n. Yancey, William L., 288 Yankee in Canada, a, 10 Year of Jubilee, the, 285 Year's life, a, 246 Yemassee, the, 351 Yonge, Miss, 137 Young America series, 404 Young Christian,