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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 218 4 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 76 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 66 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 61 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 50 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 34 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 25 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 1 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for H. G. Wright or search for H. G. Wright in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 7 document sections:

Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac- crossing the Rapidan-entering the Wilderness- battle of the Wilderness (search)
Brig.-Gen. Henry Baxter. Third Brigade, Col. Andrew W. Denison. Third Division, Brig.-Gen. Samuel W. Crawford. First Brigade, Col. Wm. McCandless. Third Brigade, Col. Joseph W. Fisher. Fourth Division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Wadsworth. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lysander Cutler. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James C. Rice. Third Brigade, Col. Roy Stone. Artillery Brigade, Col. C. S. Wainwright. Maj.-Gen. John Sedgwick, commanding Sixth Army Corps. First Division, Brig.-Gen. H. G. Wright. First Brigade, Col. Henry W. Brown. Second Brigade, Col. Emory Upton. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. D. A. Russell. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alexander Shaler. Second Division, Brig.-Gen. George W. Getty. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Frank Wheaton. Second Brigade, Col. Lewis A. Grant. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thos. H. Neill. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry L. Eustis. Third Division, Brig.-Gen. James B. Ricketts. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Wm. H. Morris. Second Brigade,
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Battle of Spottsylvania-Hancock's position-assault of Warren's and Wright's corps-upton promoted on the field-good news from Butler and Sheridan (search)
sylvania-Hancock's position-assault of Warren's and Wright's corps-upton promoted on the field-good news from brought up and placed to the left of Sedgwick's-now Wright's-6th corps. In the morning General Sedgwick had b the Army of the Potomac and to the Nation. General H. G. Wright succeeded him in the command of his corps. tack in the afternoon on the centre by Warren's and Wright's corps, Hancock to command all the attacking forceand Mott of the same corps was still to the left of Wright's corps. Burnside was ordered to reconnoitre his f induce him to report recommending the assault. Wright also reconnoitred his front and gained a considerabthe afternoon the assault was ordered, Warren's and Wright's corps, with Mott's division of Hancock's corps, tith him. His corps was now joined with Warren's and Wright's in this last assault. It was gallantly made, man Burnside's position now separated him widely from Wright's corps, the corps nearest to him. At night he was
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Hancock's assault-losses of the Confederates- promotions recommended-discomfiture of the enemy-ewell's attack-reducing the artillery (search)
he importance of a prompt and vigorous attack. Warren and Wright should hold their corps as close to the enemy as possible,was ordered to move his command by the rear of Warren and Wright, under cover of night, to Wright's left, and there form itWright's left, and there form it for an assault at four o'clock the next morning. The night was dark, it rained heavily, and the road was difficult, so tha you every assistance in their power. Generals Warren and Wright will hold their corps as close to the enemy as possible, tard vigorously. Hancock was notified of this. Warren and Wright were ordered to hold themselves in readiness to join in thturned, facing them the other way, and continued to hold. Wright was ordered up to reinforce Hancock, and arrived by six o' the 5th corps, or rather if Warren, had been as prompt as Wright was with the 6th corps, better results might have been obts was now temporarily broken up, Cutler's division sent to Wright, and Griffin's to Hancock. Meade ordered his chief of sta
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Interview with Sheridan-Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac-Sheridan's advance on five Forks-battle of five Forks-Parke and Wright storm the enemy's line-battles before Petersburg (search)
e on five Forks-battle of five Forks-Parke and Wright storm the enemy's line-battles before Petersbuin the centre might be successfully made. General Wright's corps had been designated to make this adie gradually and slowly, and asked me to send Wright's corps to his assistance. I replied to him that it was impossible to send Wright's corps because that corps was already in line close up to the April. I then issued orders for an assault by Wright and Parke at four o'clock on the morning of the in the morning. At that hour Parke's and Wright's corps moved out as directed, brushed the aba something of a stand, from one to another, as Wright moved on; but the latter met no serious obstacust be nearly two miles apart. Both Parke and Wright captured a considerable amount of artillery anenched picket-lines in their front; and before Wright got up to that point, Ord had also succeeded is, never to be wrenched from them again. When Wright reached Hatcher's Run, he sent a regiment to d[3 more...]
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The capture of Petersburg-meeting President Lincoln in Petersburg-the capture of Richmond --pursuing the enemy-visit to Sheridan and Meade (search)
ad so that it was impossible to get on. Then, again, our cavalry had struck some of the enemy and were pursuing them; and the orders were that the roads should be given up to the cavalry whenever they appeared. This caused further delay. General Wright, who was in command of one of the corps which were left back, thought to gain time by letting his men go into bivouac and trying to get up some rations for them, and clearing out the road, so that when they did start they would be uninterrupte one corps of infantry with a little cavalry confronting Lee's entire army. Meade, always prompt in obeying orders, now pushed forward with great energy, although he was himself sick and hardly able to be out of bed. Humphreys moved at two, and Wright at three o'clock in the morning, without rations, as I have said, the wagons being far in the rear. I stayed that night at Wilson's Station on the South Side Railroad. On the morning of the 5th I sent word to Sheridan of the progress Meade w
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Battle of Sailor's Creek-engagement at Farmville-correspondence with General Lee-Sheridan Intercepts the enemy. (search)
ertaken them. When the move towards Amelia Court House had commenced that morning, I ordered Wright's corps, which was on the extreme right, to be moved to the left past the whole army, to take thto move by and place itself on the right. The object of this movement was to get the 6th corps, Wright's, next to the cavalry, with which they had formerly served so harmoniously and so efficiently i(Griffin's), Ord falling in between Griffin and the Appomattox. Crook's division of cavalry and Wright's corps pushed on west of Farmville. When the cavalry reached Farmville they found that some of, and succeeded in destroying the bridge after them. Considerable fighting ensued there between Wright's corps and a portion of our cavalry and the Confederates, but finally the cavalry forded the stream and drove them away. Wright built a foot-bridge for his men to march over on and then marched out to the junction of the roads to relieve Humphreys, arriving there that night. I had stopped the
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The end of the war-the March to Washington- one of Lincoln's anecdotes-grand review at Washington-characteristics of Lincoln and Stanton-estimate of the different corps commanders (search)
n in danger if Mr. Stanton had been in the field. These characteristics of the two officials were clearly shown shortly after Early came so near getting into the capital. Among the army and corps commanders who served with me during the war between the States, and who attracted much public attention, but of whose ability as soldiers I have not yet given any estimate, are Meade, Hancock, Sedgwick, Burnside, Terry and Hooker. There were others of great merit, such as Griffin, Humphreys, Wright and Mackenzie. Of those first named, Burnside at one time had command of the Army of the Potomac, and later of the Army of the Ohio. Hooker also commanded the Army of the Potomac for a short time. General Meade was an officer of great merit, with drawbacks to his usefulness that were beyond his control. He had been an officer of the engineer corps before the war, and consequently had never served with troops until he was over forty-six years of age. He never had, I believe, a command