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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for R. A. Wright or search for R. A. Wright in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
s and E. L. Haines; Acting-Ensign, C. P. Walters; Acting-Masters' Mates, W. S. Curtis, Wm. Frost and C. H. Howland; Engineers: Chief, John A. Grier; First Assistant, H. B. Nones; Second-Assistant. Henry Brown; Third-Assistants, W. H. Glading, R. A. Wright, G. W. Carrick, John Franklin and M. Cuthbert; Boatswain, Wm. Long; Gunner, G. W. Omensetter; Carpenter, Amos Chick; Sailmaker, W. S. L. Brayton. Iron-clad steamer Passaic. Captain, Percival Drayton; Lieutenant-Commander, Joseph N. Milled sent Commander C. R. P. Rodgers on shore with the marines and a party of seamen to take possession and prevent, if necessary, the destruction of public property. The transports now got underway, and came rapidly up, and by nightfall Brigadier-General Wright's brigade had landed and entered upon the occupation of the ground. I have said, in the beginning of this report, that the plan of attack designed making the reduction of Fort Walker the business of the day. In passing to the northwar
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
shore with a flag of truce. The hasty flight of the enemy was visible, and was reported from the tops. At twenty minutes after two Captain Rodgers hoisted the flag of the Union over the deserted post. At forty-five minutes after two I anchored and sent Commander C. R. P. Rodgers on shore with the marines and a party of seamen to take possession and prevent, if necessary, the destruction of public property. The transports now got underway, and came rapidly up, and by nightfall Brigadier-General Wright's brigade had landed and entered upon the occupation of the ground. I have said, in the beginning of this report, that the plan of attack designed making the reduction of Fort Walker the business of the day. In passing to the northward, however, we had improved every opportunity of firing at long range on Fort Beauregard. As soon as the fate of Fort Walker was decided, I dispatched a small squadron to Fort Beauregard to reconnoitre and ascertain its condition, and to prevent the