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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Clark W. Wright or search for Clark W. Wright in all documents.

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Hence we see whither this movement is tending. It is a change of government; and in that the Senator and myself most fully concur. The Senator from Kentucky was wonderfully alarmed at the idea of a dictator, and replied with as much point as possible to the Senator from Oregon, who made the suggestion. But, sir, what do we find in The Richmond Examiner, published at the seat of Government of the so-called Confederate States? In the late debates of the Congress of this Confederacy, Mr. Wright, of Georgia, showed a true appreciation of the crisis when he advocated the grant of power to the President, that would enable him to make immediate defence of Richmond, and to bring the whole force of the Confederacy to bear on the affairs of Virginia. It is here that the fate of the Confederacy is to be decided; and the time is too short to permit red tape to interfere with public safety. No power in executive hands can be too great, no discretion too absolute, at such moments as these
Captain First Cavalry. A. A.-G. Army of the West. Report of Captain Wright. camp near Rolla, August 19, 1861. Major: On the morninut the tremor of a single man. Very respectfully submitted, Clark W. Wright, Captain Commanding Dade County Squadron. Report of the Nased the hill on the north, moving in a southwesterly direction, Captain Wright, with the mounted Home Guards, was sent to the east side so as ide of the creek, to engage a force which was operating against Captain Wright's cavalry, sheltering themselves behind a fence. Captain Plummt, however, dense enough to be any impediment to the artillery. Capt. Wright, with three or four companies of mounted Home Guards, the only ohould they approach. Through the thin stalks of the broom-corn, Capt. Wright had seen the ambuscade, and approached only near enough to draw wa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansas cavalry, and Capt. Wright of the Home Guards. Col. Bates, of the Iowa First, who had been
erly direction. As we crossed the hill on the north, moving in a southwesterly direction, Captain Wright, with the mounted Home Guards, was sent to the east side so as to cut off a party of rebels ulars were sent to the east side of the creek, to engage a force which was operating against Captain Wright's cavalry, sheltering themselves behind a fence. Captain Plummer and Captain Gilbert, with s and underwood, which was not, however, dense enough to be any impediment to the artillery. Capt. Wright, with three or four companies of mounted Home Guards, the only ones in the engagement, was ses to the Home Guard cavalry should they approach. Through the thin stalks of the broom-corn, Capt. Wright had seen the ambuscade, and approached only near enough to draw their fire, when he withdrew, regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansas cavalry, and Capt. Wright of the Home Guards. Col. Bates, of the Iowa First, who had been confined for several days wit