Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for George P. Wright or search for George P. Wright in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

master Kitchen and Lesley G. Morrow, Captain's Clerk, remained on deck during the action, and contributed their parts to my entire satisfaction. Acting Assistant-Surgeon George P. Wright not only attended to our three cases of wounded, (one mortally,) but gave his professional services to the Oneida, to several of their wounded whupon him, but his whole duty by the wounded was done quietly and skilfully. Medical assistance was offered from the Galena; it was accepted, and Acting Assistant-Surgeon George P. Wright came on board, for which we owe him our thanks. At the time that our boiler was exploded, five of our wounded went on board the Galena; four suby on board this vessel while passing Fort Morgan: Wounded — James McCafferty, coal-heaver, scalp-wound, with concussion of the brain. Very respectfully, Geo. P. Wright, Acting Assistant-Surgeon, United States Navy. To Lieut. Com. C. H. Wells, U. S. Navy, Commanding United States Steamer Galena. Report of casualties on th
nd of Major-General French, and on the right, at Rappahanock Ford, by the Fifth and Sixth corps, under command of Major-General Sedgwick. In this corps, Brigadier-General Wright place, had command of the corps in Sedgwick's place, while General Russell assumed the command of the First division, vacated by General Wright. At daGeneral Wright. At daybreak, on the morning of the seventh instant, this corps left its pleasant camps in and around Warrenton, and moved rapidly on toward Rappahanock Station, this division leading the corps, while this brigade had the advance in the division. After marching about six miles, we arrived at Fayetteville, where all the companies but onome of the skirmishers of the Twentieth, commanded by Captain Morrill, found themselves on our side of the railway. At this time General Russell sent word to General Wright that the works in his front could be carried by storm, and that he desired to try it. Permission was given, and General Russell at once moved forward his brig
., and who all deserve the thanks of the General for labors done by them. The distances were determined before the battle for the use of artillery, and the heights of artillery positions occupied by us and the enemy. Very respectfully, W. F. Smith, Brigadier-General, Chief Engineer Military Division of the Mississippi. Report of Brigadier-General Whitaker. shell Mound, Tenn., headquarters Second brigade, Third division, Fourth corps, army of the Cumberland, Dec. 6, 1863. To Lieutenant Wright, A. A. G., First Division, Fourth Corps: The following report of the part taken by my brigade in storming Lookout Mountain, and driving the enemy from before Chattanooga, is submitted: On leaving Shell Mound, the One Hundred and Fifteenth Illinois, the Eighty-fourth Indiana, and the Fifth Indiana battery were detailed to defend the works erected at that place for the protection of our supply train. They were under the command of Colonel Moore of the One Hundred and Fifteenth Ill
ing his troops from the left of his line to protect and strengthen his right, which General Warren threatened. During this movement, General Warren lost fifty men, killed and wounded. It was now dark, and General Warren at once reported to army headquarters in person. Upon arriving there, he learned that it was determined to make a general assault at daylight next day, November thirtieth. General French, commanding Third corps, had regarded an assault in his front not practicable. General Wright thought he could force the rebel line and hold a position on our right, and he soon reported his force in line of battle, ready for the aggressive movement. The weakness of the enemy on our left was fully admitted by General Warren, and in his official report of the late campaign, to the War Department, he states this fact in the plainest terms. General Meade, after holding a consultation with General Warren's senior officers, concluded to increase his (General Warren's) command by t
the prison-doors, and by a late hour of the evening, with the assistance of my staff and some citizens, all the men arrested had been released and returned to their homes. This order secured them exemption from arrest for some days, until Major-General Wright assumed immediate command of the city, when, for some unknown reason — perhaps because it was thought that the removal of General Wallace from the command had annulled his orders — the police, a third time, began arresting the colored men, those to whom for sickness, or other cause, I had given passes to return to the city. I again bore a peremptory order, this time from General Wright, to Mayor Hatch, commanding him not to arrest colored men except for crime. This again opened the prison-doors, and since that time, no colored man has been arrested in the city of Cincinnati, merely because he was a colored man. Whether these arrests were made by the police, of their own volition, or in obedience to orders from superiors, I know
t General Banks was menacing Alexandria, and they decided to sacrifice one of the two places to hold the other. The troops have already reembarked, and are on the way to Alexandria. Fort De Russy takes its name from Colonel De Russy, who formerly commanded in this vicinity, and lives not far distant. Lieutenant-Colonel Bird was in command, though he reported to General Walker, whose headquarters were at Alexandria. The following officers are prisoners: Captains Stevens, Morran, Wise, Wright, Laird, and King; Lieutenants Denson, Fuller, Fogarty, Claydon, Trumbull, (Eng.,) Burbank, Hewey, Assenheimer, Fall, Hauk, Ball, Little, Barksdale, Spinks, Bringhurst, and Stout. From various sources we gather that the rebels here have about abandoned the idea of defending any of their navigable streams. When asked to account for their apparent neglect of so important a fort, they reply that this was considered merely as an experiment in engineering, (certainly a very creditable one, and