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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 218 4 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 76 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 66 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 61 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 50 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 34 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 25 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 1 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for H. G. Wright or search for H. G. Wright in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 4 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
June, 1862. I deem it necessary to place the facts of this attack in their proper light, because that is the reason assigned by Gillmore for not having attacked by James Island in July, 1863, when he attempted the Morris Island route. The truth of the matter is, that the point attacked by Generals Benham and I. I. Stevens near Secessionville The assault at Secessionville was made by Stevens's division of about 3500 men, supported by General H. G. Wright's division, numbering 3100. Wright's troops were not seriously engaged. The aggregate Union loss was 683, of whom 529 belonged to Stevens's division. According to the report of General David Hunter, who commanded the department, the attack was made by General Benham in violation of his instructions. The Confederate force engaged was commanded by General N. G. Evans, and sustained a loss of about 200.--editors. was the strongest one of the whole line, which was then unfinished and was designed to be some five miles in len
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
Ewell with his whole force. General Sedgwick, with Wright's division and Neill's brigade of Getty's division,by General Griffin of Warren's corps. Ricketts and Wright of Sedgwick were delayed in reaching their position Crawford's right, reached to the Orange turnpike. Wright's division of Sedgwick formed on the right of Griff morning, without success. The same may be said of Wright, of Sedgwick's Sixth Corps, who was attacking Ewelle noted that Griffin's line, before connecting with Wright, extended a short distance parallel with the Orangeal Lee on the way to Richmond. Shaler's brigade of Wright's division of Sedgwick's corps had been guarding ththem, the assailants were prevented from destroying Wright's division. Wright kept his men in order. [See p.Wright kept his men in order. [See p. 127.] This is in fact the end of the battle of the Wilderness, so far as relates to the infantry. Our cavay when Crawford's division of the Fifth and one of Wright's brigades under Penrose assaulted what proved to b
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cold Harbor. (search)
he Army of the Potomac, the Sixth Corps, under Wright, over roads that were many inches deep in dustsarily fall, consisted of Hancock on the left, Wright in the center, and Smith on the right. Warrens intending to attack. The line of advance of Wright's command holding the center was therefore peron W. F. Smith's corps arrived on the right of Wright, extending the Union line to Beulah Church. At 6 o'clock Smith and Wright drove the enemy through the woods along the road to New Cold Harbor andith. On June 2d Hancock formed on the left of Wright. Hill's corps and Breckinridge's division toofederate left. Hancock's line, connecting with Wright's left, extended obliquely to the left and rea advance until Wright advanced upon his right; Wright, that it was impossible for him to move until Hancock's and Smith's dispatches were sent to Wright and copies of his to each of the others. The rovoked by the other corps reached his lines. Wright adopted the same rule of action. Twelve o'clo[3 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Eighteenth Corps at Cold Harbor. (search)
to me as a reserve. About the same time General Wright, commanding the Sixth Corps, sent to say tispositions to attack to-morrow morning on General Wright's right, and in conjunction with that offi than half their length. I have called on General Wright for about 100,000 rounds of ammunition, anntil 5 P. M. At 7 A. M. I received from General Wright sufficient ammunition to fill up the cartrnce of any military plan, I sent a note to General Wright, commanding the corps on my left, asking hand thus have two corps acting in unison. General Wright replied that he was going to pitch in. Thmn for an assault, thinking then to inform General Wright that I would make with him a combined assaf the Potomac, dated June 3d, 8 A. M.: General Wright has been ordered to assault and to continu assault be continued without reference to General Wright's. General Wright has, but a very short tiGeneral Wright has, but a very short time before the receipt of your communication through Major West, reported that he was waiting your ad