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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 218 4 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 76 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 66 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 61 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 50 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 34 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 25 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 1 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for H. G. Wright or search for H. G. Wright in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. (search)
ybee River was made by Captain C. H. Davis and Commander C. R. P. Rodgers with the Ottawa, Seneca, Ellen, Western World, and the armed launches of the Wabash, accompanied by three transports, having on board 2,400 troops, commanded by Brigadier General H. G. Wright. The expedition crossed the bar, and reached a point nearest Fort Pulaski on its land side. No shots were fired at the vessels, as the enemy had no rifle guns mounted in that quarter, so that the expedition was enabled to accomplishnville, Alabama, Keystone State, Seneca, Huron, Paulina, Isaac Smith, Penguin, Potomska, armed cutter; McClellan, armed transport, with a battalion of marines under Major Reynolds, and six transports containing a brigade under command of Brigadier General Wright. The vessels anchored at 10:30 A. M. on the second of March, to examine the channel and wait for the tide. Here the Flagofficer learned from residents of Cumberland Island, that the Confederates had hastily abandoned the defences of
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
nd the gunboats Ottawa, Lieut.-Commanding Stevens; Seneca, Lieut.-Commanding Ammen, and the armed steamer, Isaac Smith, Lieut.-Commanding Nicholson; the Potomska, Lieut.-Commanding Watmough; the Ellen, Master Budd; Western World, Gregory, and the two armed launches of the Wabash, and having in company the transports Cosmopolitan, Delaware and Boston, on board of which were the 6th Connecticut, the 4th New Hampshire and the 97th Pennsylvania regiments, in all 2,400 men, commanded by Brig.-General H. G. Wright. Commander C. R. P. Rodgers accompanied the expedition. The object of this move was to cut off the communication between Fort Pulaski and Savannah. The vessels entered Little Tybee River, or Freeborn Cut, and passed Fort Pulaski, but were not fired into, as the fort was not prepared for an enemy on this side. Preparations were at once made, however, to receive the expedition warmly on its return. The distance was that of long-range guns. The vessels were brought to a sto