Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Marcus J. Wright or search for Marcus J. Wright in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), four years with General Lee --a Review by General C. M. Wilcox. (search)
irginia. Page 50. Referring to reinforcements that joined General Johnston after he had reached the vicinity of Richmond, May, 1862, says: He was reinforced by Huger's division, consisting of three brigades under Generals Mahone, Armistead and Wright. One of Huger's brigades, preceding and including Seven Pines, was commanded by General Blanchard. This brigade may have been subsequently known as Wright's brigade. Page 71. Enumerating the Confederate forces engaged at Sharpsburg, says: ThWright's brigade. Page 71. Enumerating the Confederate forces engaged at Sharpsburg, says: The command of General Longstreet at that time embraced six brigades under D. R. Jones, the two under General Hood and one unattached under General Evans. His other three brigades were temporarily detached under General R. H. Anderson. There were six brigades so detached under Anderson. His own (Anderson's) division of three brigades and the three brigades of Wilcox, Featherston and Pryor, that I commanded; these were assigned to General Anderson the afternoon he marched from near Frederick Cit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ttle of the 2d July by my brigade, Perry's and Wright's of Anderson's division, I will here insert wyself personally and the brigades of Perry and Wright, I addressed him a note, requesting informatiorps; your (Wilcox's) brigade, Perry's brigade, Wright's brigade, in part or in whole of Anderson's dherefore, go astray, nor did I cause Perry and Wright to wander off, as twice charged in the most diing become separated from McLaws, Wilcox's and Wright's brigades advanced with great gallantry, breaof his artillery. Wilcox reached the foot and Wright gained the crest of the ridge itself, driving not mention Perry's, which was to the right of Wright's and on the left and a little in rear of mine when we advanced. If General Lee meant that Wright and Wilcox and the left of McLaws fell back in der mentioned, he is incorrect. I did not see Wright's brigade during the battle. The Florida brig day's battle represents Wilcox's, Perry's and Wright's brigades all in line at the extreme point of[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
We had made no further application, but had been gratified to hear that a more liberal policy seemed to characterize the present administration — that Secretary McCrary seemed disposed to allow our people more privileges than we had ever had before — and that Colonel Scott, who had been put in charge of the archives, seemed to be a gentleman of very liberal views. We are glad to be able to announce to the Society and to our friends generally, that our Committee has received from General Marcus J. Wright (a gallant soldier of the Army of Tennessee), who has been employed as an agent of the Archive Bureau, a letter, in which he says that the Secretary of War authorizes him to tender any agent of the Southern Historical Society free access to the archives, and the privilege of copying anything needed for historical purposes. This proffer (made voluntarily and without conditions) will be appreciated by our friends. Of course our Committee have cordially accepted and reciprocated th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
liberal policy towards some of our friends. Under date of August 7, 1878, however, we received a letter from General Marcus J. Wright, late of the Confederate Army of Tennessee, in which he announced his appointment as an agent of the War Departm by tendering the War Department free access to our archives, and the privilege of copying anything they might wish. General Wright at once came to Richmond, and had a very satisfactory interview with the Secretary and other members of our Executivenel R. N. Scott, who is in charge of the compilation of the records; Mr. A. P. Tasker, who is keeper of the archives; General Wright, and other gentlemen connected with the War-record office. General Townsend received me with every courtesy and kio the Archive Office impressed me very favorably with the system, order and care with which everything is managed. General Wright, of course, showed me every courtesy, and I was more than ever impressed with his high qualifications for his positio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual meeting of Southern Historical Society, October 28th and 29th, 1878. (search)
e in this direction, and Colonel Z. Davis, of South Carolina, has done efficient work in his State. In conclusion, we would express our increasing sense of the importance of the work committed to our charge, and renew our pledge to use our best endeavors to meet the obligations and discharge the duties of our trust. By order of the Executive Committee. Dabney H. Maury, Chairman. J. William Jones, Secretary. The report was unanimously adopted. General Maury announced the death of Colonel D. W. Floweree, of Vicksburg, a life-member of the Society, and paid an appropriate tribute to his memory — the Society voting to spread appropriate resolutions on the record. Earnest remarks in reference to the interests of the Society were made by Generals D. H. Maury, W. B. Taliaferro, J. A. Early and Marcus J. Wright, Colonel C. S. Venable, General J. G. Field and others. There was a general expression of gratification at the prosperous and hopeful condition of the Society.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual reunion of the Virginia division, A. N. V. (search)
nnessee--The pennon droops that led the sacred band Along the crimson field; The meteor-blade sinks from the nerveless hand Over the spotless shield. General Marcus J. Wright. 6. The Dead--They need no tears who lived a noble life, We will not weep for them — who died so well, But we will gather round the hearth and tell The --Dead, but the end was fitting, First in the ranks he led, And he marked the height of his nation's gain, As he lay in his harness — dead! Speech of General Marcus J. Wright. As a representative of our gallant comrades of the West, General Wright was warmly greeted, and made the following appropriate response: As a memGeneral Wright was warmly greeted, and made the following appropriate response: As a member of the Army of Tennessee, which I believe has not heretofore had a representative at any of your reunions, I thank you sincerely for the toast just proposed. It gives me great pleasure to meet on this occasion the comrades and friends of Lee and Jackson — honored alike by the survivors of the Army of Northern Virginia and o<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
gentleman with whom to deal. We have not as yet had occasion to have any personal intercourse or correspondence directly with the Secretary of War, but we doubt not (from all we have heard) that the same remark would apply to him. General Marcus J. Wright and Mr. A. P. Tasker (who is chief clerk and keeper of the Confederate archives) have spent five days in our office, and are expecting to return again in order that they may, from the most careful examination, determine just what we have that is needed by the War Department. The more we see of General Wright the more we are disposed to congratulate the Department on securing an officer whose high character, wide acquaintance and intelligent zeal make him so emphatically the right man in the right place, in the work of collecting and compiling Confederate papers. Mr. Tasker has impressed us as being one of the finest clerks we ever met, one of the most accurate and systematic keepers of Mss., &c., with whom we ever met, an