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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
's Ferry, in his rear, and had reached Martinsburg on the 11th, while overwhelming forces were gathering before him. After skirmishing vigorously on the 12th, Early fell back on that night, and on the 14th recrossed the Potomac at White's Ford, and camped at Leesburg. This retreat was managed most skillfully and successfully, the Confederates slipping, without loss, between the armies gathering for their destruction. As the two Federal armies united and advanced south of the Potomac, under Wright of the Sixth corps, Early crossed the Blue Ridge into the Valley about Berryville. Here he repulsed an attack on the 18th, with severe loss to the assailants, and the next day began to fall back to Strasburg, a more secure position, now that 30,000 men were pressing him. On the 20th, Averell defeated his rear guard under Ramseur, near Winchester, but the Federals did not push on. General Grant expected that Early would be recalled to Richmond, and he had therefore ordered that the corps
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
's Ferry, in his rear, and had reached Martinsburg on the 11th, while overwhelming forces were gathering before him. After skirmishing vigorously on the 12th, Early fell back on that night, and on the 14th recrossed the Potomac at White's Ford, and camped at Leesburg. This retreat was managed most skillfully and successfully, the Confederates slipping, without loss, between the armies gathering for their destruction. As the two Federal armies united and advanced south of the Potomac, under Wright of the Sixth corps, Early crossed the Blue Ridge into the Valley about Berryville. Here he repulsed an attack on the 18th, with severe loss to the assailants, and the next day began to fall back to Strasburg, a more secure position, now that 30,000 men were pressing him. On the 20th, Averell defeated his rear guard under Ramseur, near Winchester, but the Federals did not push on. General Grant expected that Early would be recalled to Richmond, and he had therefore ordered that the corps
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
of our enemies, and give us victory; that our independence may be speedily won, and our country restored to peace and harmony. April 17th.—The weather continues warm and water is getting scarce. It was rumored yesterday that Generals Smith and Marshall had retaken Nashville. April 25th.—A cold, rainy day. Breakfasted at 10 o'clock, and walked over to my cousin's camp to fulfil my engagement with him. We rode over to the camp of the Thirty-eighth Tennessee regiment, and dined with Captain Wright, called on Colonel Looney, and returned to camp. Rumor says that the Federal gunboats have passed Fort Jackson, and that New Orleans has surrendered. Dark clouds are hovering over us. The enemy are steadily gaining ground. But we must continue to fight with unabated zeal, and trust in God, and victory will crown our efforts. April 26th.—Orders to cook five days rations, and be ready to march at a moment's notice. We expect a great battle in a few days. Sunday, April 27th.—Spen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
but little general hope of our ever attaining what we have now accomplished. From the day of our re-organization, in 1873, and the transfer of our domicil, I have never had a doubt of our success. When Mr. Hayes was installed as President, his Secretary of War, McCreary, wrote to me inviting cooperation between the archive office of the Southern Historical Society and the archive office of the United States. His proposals were liberal and his whole action enlightened He appointed General Marcus J. Wright, of the late Confederate army, to the duty of collecting from all sources the records of the Confederacy, and sent him to confer with me about the details of our cooperation. This policy of Mr. McCreary has almost completed our work of collection. We have now to deal with that of preserving what we have collected, and it is the duty of all who have an interest in our work, in every State of the late Southern Confederacy, to procure for us such appropriations as will place—here,