Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Marcus J. Wright or search for Marcus J. Wright in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Officers of Gen. R. E. Lee's staff. (search)
Officers of Gen. R. E. Lee's staff. Columbus, Miss., October 18, 1907. my dear Col. Talcott,—I have before me your revised, corrected and added list of Officers of General R. E. Lee's Staff, with the data furnished by General Marcus J. Wright, of the War Department in Washington. As far as I know, it is now the most correct list extant, and you can safely have it published. With kind wishes, your comrade and friend, (Signed) Stephen D. Lee. General Lee's first service was in the western part of the State of Virginia, where he was attended by two aides-de-camp, Colonel John A. Washington and Captain Walter H. Taylor. Colonel John Augustine Washington was killed at Valley Mountain, September, 1861. During his three month's service in South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, he had with him in addition to his aide, Captain Walter H. Taylor, Lieutenant Colonel Wm. G. Gill, Ordnance Officer; Captain Thornton A. Washington, A. A. & I. General; Major A. L. Long, Chi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
the wounded were groaning in temporary hospitals. We were with Semmes' Brigade, consisting of the 15th and 32nd Virginia, 5th and 10th Louisiana, 10th and 53rd Georgia, moved up within 1,200 yards of the enemy's batteries and held in reserve in a ravine, and were subjected to a shelling unsurpassed for severity in any conflict during the war. The concentration of our forces was not completed until late in the day, and it was between 3 and 4 P. M. before the advance was made by Mahone's and Wright's Brigades, which met with a terrible repulse. Such was the accuracy of the fire of the enemy that the field was swept clean. One of our batteries that went in with the above named brigades did not have an opportunity to unlimber; the horses being killed and the caissons blown up and guns dismounted before they could get into action. Soon the reserve was called for. We moved towards the right and were ordered to charge with fixed bayonets through a meadow, at a distance of about 500 yar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.47 (search)
ounty, Va. Wallace, William H., private. Wliliamsville, Va. Wallace, C. R., private. Living; Williamsville, Va. Williams, James T., private. Know nothing. Williams, Jeff, private. Know nothing. Williams, Erastus, private. Living; Bath county, Va. Williams, Robert, private. Dead. Wright, James H., private. Dead. Wright, Tyler, private. Dead. Woods, F. M., private. Died in prison, 1863. Whitmore, James, private. Parnassus, Va. Walton, John, private. Living. ounty, Va. Wallace, William H., private. Wliliamsville, Va. Wallace, C. R., private. Living; Williamsville, Va. Williams, James T., private. Know nothing. Williams, Jeff, private. Know nothing. Williams, Erastus, private. Living; Bath county, Va. Williams, Robert, private. Dead. Wright, James H., private. Dead. Wright, Tyler, private. Dead. Woods, F. M., private. Died in prison, 1863. Whitmore, James, private. Parnassus, Va. Walton, John, private. Living.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.65 (search)
Polignac's mission. From the Times-dispatch, May 19, 1901. An interesting Chapter in Confederate History—Defence of President Davis. The story of the proposed Cession of Louisiana to France Exploded— an interview with the Emperor—Foreign aid and slavery. The following throws interesting light on an incident of Confederate history, which has been greatly distorted: Villa Jessie, Cannes, France, April 17, 1901. General Marcus J. Wright: My Dear General,—I enclose the narrative of my journey to France in 1865, intended to refute the suggestions of the Washington Post, and beg that you will kindly, in defence of the honor of President Jefferson Davis, General Kirby Smith, and my own self, give my explanations the widest publicity. You will observe that on page 6 I have the military rank of Governor Allen as colonel, written in pencil; the reason is that I do not remember whether he was then colonel or general, and I wish you would kindly correct the rank and the in