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nion of the, D. 87 United States Congress, an extra session of, called, D. 25 United Turner Rifies leave New York, D. 102 Up Brothers, all, P. 16 Utica, N. Y., Union meeting at, D. 35 V Van Buren, W. H., M. D., D. 96 Vance, J. C., Captain, D. 78 Van Dorn,----, Colonel, D. 43; seizes the Star of the West, Doc. 119; captures U. S. troops at Saluria, Texas, Doc. 146 Vanity Fair, Joseph Lane's letter to, P. 24 Van Riper, Benjamin, D. 28 Van Wyck, Charles H., D. 86 Vermilyea, —, Rev. Dr., Doc. 110 Vermont, 1st Regt. of, D. 65; Doc. 231; at Hampton, Va., D. 78; experiences of the, at Fortress Monroe, D. 97; a private account of the operations of the, at Newport News, Va., Doc. 348 Victoria, Queen, proclamation of neutrality of, Doc. 245 Vicksburg, Miss., artillery ordered to, by the rebels, D. 14 Viele, Egbert L., Captain, D. 48 Vienna, Va, ambuscade at, D. 106; reports of the surprise at, Doc. 405; re
n by the soldiers in the service of the United States may be transmitted through the mails without the prepayment of postage, under such regulations as the Post-Office Department may prescribe; the postage thereon to be paid by the recipient. Mr. Van Wyck, of New-York, moved as a substitute: That the colonel of every regiment now or hereafter to be in the service of the United States, shall appoint the chaplain of his regiment, and in case there be no chaplain, then any person he may deem compef receiving letters and papers to be carried to the post-offices and mails of the United States: That the appointment referred to in the first section of this act shall, by said post-master, be filed in the office of the Postmaster-General. Mr. Van Wyck's amendment was rejected, and then Mr. Colfax's amendment was adopted. Mr. Burnett offered as a proviso to be added to the end of the bill: That the military force hereby provided for in this act, shall not be employed in subjugating and ho
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter army life and camp drill (search)
at had seen generations of 'possum, and answered with smiling certainty, Eat 'um, sa? oh, yes, sa. If he eber taste 'um, he eat 'um, sure, and the thing was sent. December 21 Another frivolity is court-martials. I find that every colonel is court-martialed first or last as every child has measles. Of five colonels here, one, Colonel White, was court-martialed before I came here, another (Colonel Rust) afterwards. I have sat upon Colonel Sammons, the third and now am sitting on Colonel Van Wyck, the fourth. When this is over I shall be the only one left. Hilton Head, January 8, 1864 Nothing gives a Democrat a better glimpse of aristocratic privileges than to travel in a military department. When men see you are a colonel, all difficulties are smoothed and all privileges accorded, unless a general heaves in sight, and then you are nothing; and it is astonishing how soon one learns to claim for one's self these special privileges as if made of better clay. It must be far
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
ng renounced hope of another slave State in the West and of dominion in the Union, were now busy with preparations for secession and armed revolt. As to the military preparations at the South, see speeches of Miles in the House, Jan. 6, 1860; Van Wyck, March 7; and Mason in the Senate, March 1. Von Hoist, vol. VII. pp. 111-114, 366 note. Nicolay and Hay's Life of Lincoln, vol. II. pp. 300, 333. Another and more eventful period was at hand. The new Capitol, with its ampler dome, and it however, who, absent in Europe when the session began, did not take his seat till after the holiday recess, had hardly a more friendly reception. As to the military preparations at the South, see speeches of Miles in the House, Jan. 6, 1860; Van Wyck, March 7; and Mason in the Senate, March 1. Von Hoist, vol. VII. pp. 111-114, 366 note. Nicolay and Hay's Life of Lincoln, vol. II. pp. 300, 333. The bitterness of the two sections had increased since Sumner's last participation in the busine
Van Dervoort, P., X., 296. Vandewater, J., X., 288. Van Dorn, E.: I, 206, 235, 245; II., 143 seq., 183, 190, 200, 204, 324, 328, 330; IV., 49; capture, 116, 133, 263; V., 70; VI, 308; VII., 28, 30, 233; X., 251, 270, 272. Van Duzen, J. C., VIII., 358 seq. Vannerson, photographer: IX., 123; X., 63. Van Norman, L. E., I., 10. Van Sant, S. R., X., 296. Van Valkenburgh, D. H., I., 295. Van Valkenbergh, T. S., VIII, 362. Van Vinson Vii, 125. Van Wyck, C. H., X., 229. Vaquin, E., VIII., 169. Varnells Station, Ga., III., 320. Varuna,, U. S. S., VI, 190, 191, 198. Varuna Landing, Va.: pontoon bridge at, IV.; 189. Vaughen, A. J., X., 299. Vaughen, J. C.: III., 322; X., 299. Vaughts Hill, Milton, Tenn. , II., 332. Veatch, J. C., X., 87. Veazy, W. G., X., 296. Venable, R. M., I, 105. Venus,, C. S. S., transport, IV., 163. Vera Cruz, Mexico, VI., 45; X., 58. Verandah Ho
evens, of Pennsylvania, agreed with Mr. Pryor, that no compromise can be effected, and cited the news of yesterday from South Carolina to show it. The Southern States could not be turned from their deliberate action by soft words or tears. He opposed the right of secession. Mr. Harris, of Md., denied the constitutionality of the right of secession. He expressed the belief that not a corporal's guard in Maryland favored disunion. Faults had been committed on both sides, but Southern politicians fostered disunion, as affording a new sphere for their defeated ambition in the Union. He favored Crittenden's resolutions. Mr. Winslow, of N. C., defended Southern rights, and reviewed the proceedings of the committee. He said the North ultimately designed the total abrogation of slavery, and without quarter, and it could not be expected the South would remain in the Union. Mr. Van Wyck denounced secession, but counseled conciliation. No action was had. Adjourned.
General Scott on military discipline. --The following is a copy of a letter written by General Scott to Mr. Fillmore, in 1847: "Headquarters of the Army, "Mexico, 1847. "My Dear Sir --I have received the two letters (one from the Rev. M. Angler, and the other signed by Mr. Van Wyck,) asking, on several grounds, the discharge of Jas. Thompson, a private in the second Artillery. "First--He has since his enlistment reformed his habits. This is an argument in favor of his serving out his time, lest he should relapse, if discharged, before confirmed in his reformation. Military discipline highly favors reformation. "Second--He has become pious. This makes him at once a better soldier and better man, and fortunately we are not without many pious officers and men in our ranks; but, "Third--It is alleged he has imbibed conscientious scruples against performing military duty. If the man be mad, he can be discharged on a surgeon's certificate to that effect; bu
Attack on Congressman Van Wyck. Washington,Feb. 22.--Representative Van Wyck, of New York, shortly after leaving the residence of Senator King, at a late hour last night, was assaulted on Capitol Hill by three persons, to him unknown. He was wounded with a heavy knife, and, while desperately resisting them, was knocked downRepresentative Van Wyck, of New York, shortly after leaving the residence of Senator King, at a late hour last night, was assaulted on Capitol Hill by three persons, to him unknown. He was wounded with a heavy knife, and, while desperately resisting them, was knocked down.--Recovering himself somewhat, he discharged his pistol, and believes the shot took effect.--The party then retreated. Mr. Van Wyck reached his hotel in a weak but not dangerous condition. pitol Hill by three persons, to him unknown. He was wounded with a heavy knife, and, while desperately resisting them, was knocked down.--Recovering himself somewhat, he discharged his pistol, and believes the shot took effect.--The party then retreated. Mr. Van Wyck reached his hotel in a weak but not dangerous condition.
al of a revolutionist. At the time reinforcements were about to be sent to Sumter, he scared old Toucey nearly to death, and made him back flat down. There was a Cabinet meeting last night in regard to Fort Pickens. Result not known. The Van Wyck assassination canard was gotten up to influence the election in New Hampshire. So was a Richmond letter in Saturday's Tribune, which represents Virginia as rising in favor of free soil, and gives Messrs. Clemens, Jackson, Scott, Stuart, and McDowell Moore an unenviable notoriety.--The belief is that Van Wyck got whipped in a house of ill-fame. The ladies of New York are getting up a monster petition in favor of the Union, such as it is. Of course, of course. Why not? Lincoln is much jaded by his recent triumphal tour and sneaking entrance into this city, --I should not be at all surprised if his fate shall be that of Harrison and Taylor — death from exhaustion after a month's Presidential labor. He is strictly guarded by
The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1861., [Electronic resource], The working men's National Convention. (search)
Ruffianism in Washington. The times are becoming lively in Washington. Congressman Van Wyck, who was never before known as a first-class combatant, has been assailed by three rogues (in buckram?) and let fly at them more furiously than honestJack. Why don't Gen.Scottkeep better order in the Federal Capital with his standing army police? Perhaps some of his heroes were the perpetrators of the deed. Letters from Washington have appeared in the columns of our city contemporaries stating that citizens have been stabbed and ladies insulted by these myrmidons.
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