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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 2 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 2 0 Browse Search
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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), University Wanted. (search)
for the purpose of induction, deduction and seduction, within its thrice-consecrated walls. We are, therefore, not at all astonished to find The Louisiana Democrat declaring that the subject of A Southern University is now engrossing the master-minds of the South, which means, of course, what it modestly declines to express, that it is universally engrossing the attention of the whole Southern intellect; for all Southern minds are well known to be master minds. Harvard is to be rivaled, and Yale is to be knocked into a common hedge-school. The South, says The Democrat, must establish a University where our sons can drink deeply. 5 We believe that they have not drunk sparingly in those institutions of learning already established; but The Democrat does not allude to cock-tails and punches; for when it speaks of drinking deeply, it refers to the pure streams of learning. In favor of that particular tipple The Democrat is arguing. Where our sons, it goes on to say, may drink deepl
ost successful and best known surgeons of the country. Two others became reputable and somewhat distinguished citizens. The remaining one is the writer. The Rev. Mr. Edson was the foster father of this school, and brought for us our teacher, Thomas N. Clark, a graduate of Yale. Mr. Clark taught us for nearly two years, and with him we went into the new schoolhouse. The numbers of the school increasing with the same rapidity as the new town, he brought to his assistance a classmate from Yale, Mr. Clapp, who afterwards left our school to go to Charleston, South Carolina, where he finally became the editor of the Charleston Mercury. He was the most bitter proslavery and states-right gentleman I ever knew, and his cutting sarcasms permeated every page of his writing. In his early life he happened to be bitten in the heel by a rattlesnake. He did not die from the bite, but those whom he did not like said the venom of the poison remained in him. For some reason, which as a boy I ne
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 14: Jesuits' pupils. (search)
de like a clerk; or go to Yale and study it like a gentleman. To which will you go? Speak, Sir; San Jose or Yale. To Yale, cried Alexander; and to Yale he went. It was a new world to me, he says; each man in that great university was freeYale he went. It was a new world to me, he says; each man in that great university was free to go his own way, to labour as he pleased. to form a character of his own. At first I was a little timid, feeling the want of guides. In time I learned to trust my powers and be a law to myself; and now that I have tried both systems, I can see tt Santa Clara will not be strong enough to hold their own in American courts, against lawyers trained in such a school as Yale. Such is the little history of a life, as told me in a chalet of Penitentia Creek, where we rest our horses for an hour good examples in our sight. If I am ever tempted, out of weakness, to fall back, I fix my thoughts on some such point as Yale in New Haven, or the Inner Temple in London. Then my fainting of the heart goes by. Of course the Jesuits have cut you
me, were pupils of Kay, though the gymnasium had no official connection with the university. During this period considerable interest was awakened in recreative games, football, baseball, and cricket then being played. College boat-clubs were formed in 1845, and the first boat-house was built in 1846. From this year on, boating was freely engaged in by the students, partly for exercise, but principally for pleasure. Although boat races began as early as 1845, there were no contests with Yale and other colleges until after 1850. During the next decade the seed sown by Harvard was beginning to bear fruit in other institutions. Match ball games and boat races were occasionally arranged, and a renewed interest in gymnastics was awakening. In 1860, the old gymnasium opposite Memorial Hall, now used by the engineering department, was erected. Immediately after the establishment of the gymnasium at Harvard in 1860, gymnasiums were built at Amherst, Dartmouth, Princeton, Yale, Wes
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
ems are the work of an experienced versifier with full command of his subject and with little poetic inspiration. The Poem on the happiness of America celebrates liberty and democracy, American scenery, resources, achievements, and prospects, with a boundless belief in the possibilities of America and her divine mission. No other member of the Hartford group, indeed no other man of letters of his time, lived a life so active and varied as Joel Barlow (1754-1812). After his graduation from Yale, he served as chaplain in the army, and in 1781 married and settled in Hartford as lawyer and editor. His philosophic poem The vision of Columbus, published in 1787, was read and admired in France and England. Barlow later went to France as agent of the notorious Scioto Land Company, apparently in ignorance of its fraudulent character. In Paris he became a strong partisan of democracy, and for several years divided his time between France and England, writing political pamphlets and books,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
which Zimmermann refers in his translation of Bartram. Indeed, a pupil of Linnaeus, Pehr Kalm, who has been included among the botanists of Philadelphia, is remembered for his description of Niagara Falls. But the influence was pervasive and general, so that geography proper soon became domesticated in this country. The Geography made easy of Jedidiah Morse, first published at New Haven in 1784, quickly went through a number of editions and transformations. About 1796 President Dwight of Yale, in his Travels, records that a work of Morse is studied by both freshmen and sophomores, probably referring to a revision of the more extensive American geography of 1789. Dwight himself made judicious use of it. The indefatigable Morse, though not a Humboldt, a Ritter, or a Leopold von Buch, was a lowly precursor of the European scientists who furnished the next generation with ideals in geography and travel. If territorial expansion and the development of geographical science are to b
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
ess, geniality, and quiet humour, however, could not conceal the lack of originality and barrenness of invention that were becoming more and more apparent among the remoter satellites of Geoffrey Crayon. The stream of discursive literature was indeed running dry when Nathaniel Parker Willis (1806-61) burst into prominence like a spring freshet, frothy, shallow, temporary, but sweeping all before it. This prince of magazinists, precociously celebrated as a poet even before his graduation from Yale in 1823, and petted by society in this country and abroad, has suffered the fate of other ten days wonders. Though the evanescent sparkle and glancing brilliance of his A l'abri, less extravagantly known by its later title of Letters from under a Bridge, fully deserved Lowell's praise, though it is possible to understand the popularity of his vivid, vivacious glimpses of European society in Pencillings by the way and the vogue of his clever Slingsby stories in Inklings of adventure, yet it c
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
h lay beyond the cleared circle of his own life. Judge Cooper, however, was less a typical backwoodsman than a kind of warden of the New York marches, like Judge Templeton in The pioneers, and he did not keep his son in the woods but sent him, first to the rector of St. Peter's in Albany, who grounded him in Latin and hatred of Puritans, and then to Yale, where he wore his college duties so lightly as to be dismissed in his third year. Thinking the navy might furnish better discipline than Yale, Judge Cooper shipped his son before the mast on a merchant vessel to learn the art of seamanship which there was then no naval academy to teach. His first ship, the Sterling, sailed from New York in October, 1806, for Falmouth and London, thence to Cartagena, back to London, and once more to America in September of the following year. They were chased by pirates and stopped by searching parties, incidents Cooper never forgot. In January, 1808, he was commissioned midshipman. He served fo
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 2: the secular writers (search)
complained, little public favor for anything but satire. He had inherited hatred for tyranny with his Huguenot blood; and there was a vein of bitterness in him which was ready enough to be worked, no doubt, when the time came. Mr. Tyler calls him the poet of hatred rather than of love; certainly his reputation at the moment was won as a merciless satirist. The Hartford wits Freneau was a classmate of James Madison at Princeton. Contemporary with him were three men of Connecticut and Yale,--Timothy Dwight, Joel Barlow, and Jonathan Trumbull. Like Freneau, these writers began by tentative experiments in prose and verse, and like him they were swept into the current of the Revolution and into the service of political satire. For a time these three writers, who came to be known as the Hartford wits, constituted a genuine literary centre in Connecticut. Literature of the Revolution. The period of their brief supremacy was a remarkable one. The year 1765 marks the end of
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
achusetts Historical Society (1878-82). He died in Boston, Mass., Jan. 1, 1730. Sill, Edward Rowland Born in Windsor, Conn., April 29, 1841. Graduating from Yale in 1861, he studied divinity for a time at Harvard and then taught in Ohio; was professor of English literature at the University of California, but resigned to de Timrod, edited, with a sketch of the poet's life, by Paul H. Hayne. Trumbull, John Born in Westbury (now Watertown), Conn., April 24, 1750. Graduating from Yale in 1767, he became tutor there and then studied law. His published works include The progress of Dulness (1772-74) ; an Elegy on the times (1774); his famous McFineared in seven volumes (1888-9). Died in Hampton Falls, N. H., Sept. 7, 1892. Willis, Nathaniel Parker Born in Portland, Me., Jan. 20, 1806. Graduating from Yale in 1827, he soon founded the American monthly magazine, which later was merged into the New York Mirror. He had already contributed to his father's magazine, the
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