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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. 2 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature. You can also browse the collection for Yale or search for Yale in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 2: the secular writers (search)
complained, little public favor for anything but satire. He had inherited hatred for tyranny with his Huguenot blood; and there was a vein of bitterness in him which was ready enough to be worked, no doubt, when the time came. Mr. Tyler calls him the poet of hatred rather than of love; certainly his reputation at the moment was won as a merciless satirist. The Hartford wits Freneau was a classmate of James Madison at Princeton. Contemporary with him were three men of Connecticut and Yale,--Timothy Dwight, Joel Barlow, and Jonathan Trumbull. Like Freneau, these writers began by tentative experiments in prose and verse, and like him they were swept into the current of the Revolution and into the service of political satire. For a time these three writers, who came to be known as the Hartford wits, constituted a genuine literary centre in Connecticut. Literature of the Revolution. The period of their brief supremacy was a remarkable one. The year 1765 marks the end of
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
achusetts Historical Society (1878-82). He died in Boston, Mass., Jan. 1, 1730. Sill, Edward Rowland Born in Windsor, Conn., April 29, 1841. Graduating from Yale in 1861, he studied divinity for a time at Harvard and then taught in Ohio; was professor of English literature at the University of California, but resigned to de Timrod, edited, with a sketch of the poet's life, by Paul H. Hayne. Trumbull, John Born in Westbury (now Watertown), Conn., April 24, 1750. Graduating from Yale in 1767, he became tutor there and then studied law. His published works include The progress of Dulness (1772-74) ; an Elegy on the times (1774); his famous McFineared in seven volumes (1888-9). Died in Hampton Falls, N. H., Sept. 7, 1892. Willis, Nathaniel Parker Born in Portland, Me., Jan. 20, 1806. Graduating from Yale in 1827, he soon founded the American monthly magazine, which later was merged into the New York Mirror. He had already contributed to his father's magazine, the