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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. 2 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22.. You can also browse the collection for Yale or search for Yale in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22., History told by names of streets. (search)
to, and has not yet got her growth. Some enterprising speculator develops vacant land or divides an ancestral estate, gives it a name, lays out streets and assigns names of his own fancy to them. For instance, at South Medford the old road to Cambridge and its college was called Harvard street. By and by there was a half-mile race-track beside it, next a brickyard, and after years of vacancy the place becomes College field, with Amherst, Bowdoin, Colby, Dartmouth, Princeton, Radcliffe and Yale, with Andover and Exeter beside. Along comes another, and across Buzzell's lane are the abandoned clay-pits of Buzzell's decadent brick industry, with a piece of upland on Main street extending to College avenue, which name, of course, relates to Tufts college. The ash dumpage of Somerville comes into the clay-pits, Captain Adams' brick house is demolished, and College acres appears. Stanley and Frederick avenues connect Main street with College avenue and Windsor road with Hinsdale stre