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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for William L. Yancey or search for William L. Yancey in all documents.

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mises of the Constitution which are broad enough and strong enough to embrace and uphold the Union as it was, as it is, and the Union as it shall be, in the full expansion of the energies and capacity of this great and progressive people. At this Convention, the Calhoun or extreme Southern dogma of the constitutional right of each slave-holder to remove with his slaves into any Federal Territory, and hold them there in defiance of Congress or any local authority, was submitted by Mr. William L. Yancey, of Alabama, in the following guise: Resolved, That the doctrine of noninterference with the rights of property of any portion of the people of this confederacy, be it in the States or Territories thereof, by any other than the parties interested in them, is the true Republican doctrine recognized by this body. The party was not yet ready for such strong meat, and this resolve was rejected: Nays 216; Yeas 36--South Carolina 9; Alabama 9; Georgia 9; Arkansas 3; Florida 3; Mary
Xviii. The Dred Scott case. Views of President Buchanan Chief Justice Taney Judge Wayne Judge Nelson Judge Grier Judge Daniel Judge Campbell Judge Catron Col. Benton Wm. L. Yancey Daniel Webster Judge McLean Judge Curtis. Dred Scott, a negro, was, previously to 1834, held as a slave in Missouri by Dr. Emerson, a surgeon in the U. S. Army. In that year, the doctor was transferred to the military post at Rock Island, in the State of Illinois, and took his slave with hiitizens emigrated, and in derogation of that perfect equality which belongs to them as members of this Union, and would tend directly to subvert the Union itself. The resolve submitted to the Democratic National Convention of 1848, by Mr. William L. Yancey, and unceremoniously rejected by it, 216 to 36, as will have been seen See page 192.--sets forth the same doctrine more concisely and abruptly. Col. Benton, himself a life-long slaveholder and upholder of Slavery, thus forcibly refu
s propositions which even the Southern Democracy voted down when first presented to a Democratic National Convention by Mr. Yancey in 1848, were now adopted by the United States Senate as necessary deductions from the fundamental law of the land. es and cheerfully submitting to its consequences. The Alabama delegation, which included ex-Gov. John A. Winston, Wm. L. Yancey, Reuben Chapman, ex-M. C., and other prominent citizens, thereupon withdrew from the Convention. Mr. Barry, of Misnt; and Gen. Joseph Lane, of Oregon, was nominated for Vice-President by a similar vote. And then, after a speech from Mr. Yancey, the Convention finally adjourned. The Constitutional Union (late American ) party held a Convention at Baltimore o Lieut. Governor, under Vallandigham, in 1863.--in the Charleston Convention: Thank God that a bold and honest man [Mr. Yancey] has at last spoken, and told the whole truth with regard to the demands of the South. It is now plainly before the Co
ack on Fort Sumter--to ally herself with the Rebellion, or to stand committed to any scheme looking to Disunion in whatever contingency. Her Democratic Governor and Legislature of 1860-61, with most of her leading Democratic, and many of her Whig, politicians, were, indeed, more or less cognizant of the Disunion conspiracy, and were more or less intimate and confidential with its master-spirits. But they looked to very different ends. The Southrons proper, of the school of Calhoun, Rhett, Yancey, and Ruffin, regarding Disunion as a chief good under any and all circumstances, made its achievement the great object of their life-long endeavor, and regarded Slavery in the territories, fugitive slaves and their recovery, compromises, John Brown raids, etc., only as conducive to or impeding its consummation; while the State-Rights apostles of the Border-State school contemplated Secession, and everything pertaining thereto, primarily, as means of perfecting and perpetuating the slaveholdi
herspoon, Rev. T. S., 128. Wool, Gen., succeeds Gen. Butler, 531. Wood, Col. A. M., wounded at Bull Run, 545. Woodward, Judge Geo. W., speech at the Philadelphia Peace meeting, 363 to 365; 406; 438. Worcester, Mass., mob violence at, 126. Wrentham, Mass., Abolition petition from, 144. Wright. Col. J. V., killed at Belmont, 597-8. Wright, Silas, 91; nominated for Vice-President 164; nominated for Governor of New York, 166. Wyandot, Kansas, Convention at, 250. Y. Yancey, Wm. L., his non-interference resolve in the Convention of 1848, 192; allusion to, 259; withdraws from the Charleston Convention, 314. Yates, Edward, on Slavery, 70. young men's Christian Association, their interview with the President, 466-7; allusion, 472. Z. Zagonyi, Major, his speech to his soldiers, 591-2; his gallant charge into Springfield, 592. Zeigler, Col., orders the houses of Secessionists at Guyandotte to be burnt. 526. Zollicoffer, Gen., occupies Cumberland Gap