Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Joseph A. Yates or search for Joseph A. Yates in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
n artillery manning the battery, assisted by a detachment of the Sumter Guards, Capt. John Russell. On Sullivan's island: (1) Fort Moultrie—Capt. W. R. Calhoun, Lieutenants Wagner, Rhett, Preston, Sitgreaves, Mitchell, Parker, Blake (acting engineer). (2) mortars—Capt. William Butler and Lieutenants Huguenin, Mowry, Blocker, Billings and Rice. (3) Mortars-Lieutenants Flemming and Blanding. (4) Enfilade—Captain Hallonquist and Lieutenants Valentine and Burnet. (5) Floating battery—Lieutenants Yates and Frank Harleston. (6) Dahlgren battery—Captain Hamilton. On Mount Pleasant: (1) Mortars—Captain Martin and Lieuts. F. H. Robertson and G. W. Reynolds. On Fort Johnson: (1) Mortars—Capt. G. S. James and Lieut. W. H. Gibbes. Immediately upon the fall of Sumter the most active and constant efforts were made by Governor Pickens and General Beauregard to repair and arm the fort, to strengthen the batteries defending the harbor, and to defend the city from an atta
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
eorge Johnson, were detailed as sharpshooters. Lieut.--Col. Joseph A. Yates, First regulars, made a secret disposition of aTwentieth infantry, Capt. S. M. Roof and Lieut. M. Gunter. Yates masked his guns at Grimball's and Legare‘s points, on John' afternoon of the 30th, passed Brown at Battery island and Yates on John's island, and dropped anchor opposite Gary's positit as she began her retreat, she was met by the batteries of Yates, which opened immediately. Reaching Legare‘s point, she wathis affair the Stono scouts, Captain Walpole, rendered Colonel Yates valuable service. Brown, at Battery island, was onlyh Carolina regular artillery, Col. Alfred Rhett, Lieut.-Col. Joseph A. Yates, Maj. Ormsby Blanding. Colonel Rhett commanded th which the heavy guns were fired was due to the use of Colonel Yates' traverser, with the merits of which the general comman on both sides of the channel, and Colonel Rhett, Lieutenant-Colonel Yates, Major Blanding and other officers of Fort Sumter
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
main line. A gunboat came up the Stono to cover the Federal flank, but was driven back by Battery Pringle. The enemy made one advance in force, but met such a warm reception from the artillery that no further effort was made that day. Next morning at daylight the enemy landed from barges at Shell point and made the attack on Battery Simkins and Fort Johnson. Both were fiercely assaulted by the Federals, but, said General Taliaferro, the gallant garrison, under the command of Lieut.-Col. Joseph A. Yates, received them with heroic determination, and soon staggered and drove them back, when, with a rapid charge headed by Lieutenants Waties and Reynolds, 140 prisoners, including 5 commissioned officers, were taken. The participants in this brilliant affair were the companies of Lieutenant Waties, Captain Gaillard and Lieutenant Cooper, of the First artillery, and of Lieutenants Halsey and Raworth, Second artillery. These officers and Corporal Crawford were distinguished for gallan
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
ollows: McLaws' division, composed of Conner's brigade, Colonel Kennedy; the Georgia brigade (reserves) of Col. John C. Fiser; the Georgia brigade of Col. G. P. Harrison, including a detachment of the First South Carolina cavalry; Col. W. M. Hardy's North Carolina brigade; another brigade of Georgia reserves, and six batteries of artillery. Taliaferro's division, composed of Brig.-Gen. Stephen Elliott's brigade—parts of First and Second artillery, serving as infantry, under Lieut.-Col. J. A. Yates; First cavalry, State cadets, and a company of the siege train, under Lieut.-Col. W. A. Walker. Rhett's brigade—First artillery, Maj. Ormsby Blanding; Third artillery, Col. William Butler; First militia, Col. J. Griffin; Nineteenth cavalry, Capt. M. J. Kirk; Young's cavalry; artillery, Capt. E. L. Parker, and part of Thirty-second Georgia. Not brigaded: Lusk's company First cavalry, six companies Second artillery, Fifteenth artillery battalion, Maj. J. J. Lucas; South Carolina sie
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
After recovering partially from wounds received in battle, he was commissioned second lieutenant by the governor and ordered to report to Col. Ransom Calhoun, at Fort Sumter, where he was assigned to Company I, Capt. John Mitchell, First South Carolina artillery, was later transferred to Company D, Captain Harleston, and then promoted first lieutenant of Company B, Capt. D. G. Flemming. As an artillery officer he had an active and gallant career. In January, 1863, he was ordered with Colonel Yates' battalion to John's island for the capture of the Federal steamer Isaac P. Smith, after the successful performance of which he took charge of the boat with a crew and brought her up under the guns of Fort Johnson. During the attack of the Federal monitors upon Fort Sumter, April 7, 1863, he was in command of a section of the east-face battery, in which was the famous Brooke gun. After a two hours engagement the fleet was compelled to retire with the loss of the Keokuk. On the morning