Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Richard Yates or search for Richard Yates in all documents.

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ave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave. The staff is made of mahogany, surmounted by a spear head, from which are suspended a red, white, and blue, and red, gold, and black straps and tassels. In the centre of the lance is a silver shield bearing the inscription, Presented to the De Kalb regiment, N. Y. V., by Miss Pauline A. Witthaus, June, 1861. Among the distinguished guests invited were: Gov. E. D. Morgan, Governor Hamilton Fish, Major-General John A. Dix, Brig.-General Yates, the Union Defence Committee, Colonel Franklin, Hon. George Bancroft, Hon. George Folsom, John Jacob Astor, jr., Abiel A. Low, Hon. Edward Pierrepont, Gen. P. M. Wetmore, Hon. Samuel Sloan, Henry Grinnell, Archibald Russell, Capt. M. Cogswell, Col. M. Lefferts, Dr. Alexander B. Mott, Elie Charlier, G. H. Witthaus, Egbert L. Viele, Col. Maidhoff, Col. Tompkins, Major Eaton, Amos F. Eno, Edward Jones, and others. After the presentation the officers of the regiment and the invited gue
er crossing a ravine, and ascending a high ridge, we came in full view of a considerable force of the enemy's skirmishers. Major Osterhaus' battalion was at once deployed to the right, and two companies of the First Missouri Volunteers, under Capts. Yates and Cavender, were deployed to the left, all as skirmishers. The firing now became very severe, and it was evident we were approaching the enemy's stronghold, where they intended giving battle. A few shells from Totten's battery assisted oury from the field. In this fight many of our brave soldiers fell to rise no more; while Colonel Andrews had his horse shot from under him, and was wounded himself slightly. General Lyon suffered in a similar manner. Captains Cavender, Cole, and Yates, each slightly, or at least not dangerously wounded; Lieutenants Brown and Johnson, and Corporals Conant and Rogers, more or less severely wounded. During this engagement, two companies of regulars were sent to the east side of the creek, to e
ath just as he had repulsed the foe; Lieutenant Murphy dashing forward ahead of the line, waving his sword high in the air, shouting onward to the almost wavering men, who gained fresh courage from the exhibition, and, pushing forward, drove the enemy from the field. In this fight many of our brave soldiers fell to rise no more; while Colonel Andrews had his horse shot from under him, and was wounded himself slightly. General Lyon suffered in a similar manner. Captains Cavender, Cole, and Yates, each slightly, or at least not dangerously wounded; Lieutenants Brown and Johnson, and Corporals Conant and Rogers, more or less severely wounded. During this engagement, two companies of regulars were sent to the east side of the creek, to engage a force which was operating against Captain Wright's cavalry, sheltering themselves behind a fence. Captain Plummer and Captain Gilbert, with their companies, marched close up to the fence and delivered an effective fire, but were compelled by
Doc. 192.-proclamation of Gov. Yates. State of Illinois Executive Department, Springfield, Aug. 17, 1861. To the people of Illinois:-- After urging upon the proper authorities, before and since the outbreak of hostilities, the propriety of granting to all the gallant sons of Illinois the privilege of volunteering to vindicate the supremacy of the Government, I have at length succeeded in obtaining instructions from the Secretary of War to accept all companies which shall offer themselof her Hardin, her Bissell, her Shields, and her Baker, and the gallant men around them, remain, her fame is secure. Let us now send her proudest chivalry into the field, and do nothing to mar the glories already achieved. Let us raise an army, which, in numbers, discipline, and prowess, shall of itself be sufficient to sweep the last vestige of treason from the Mississippi Valley, and to bear our flag in triumph to the ends of the republic. Richard Yates, Governor and Commander-in-Chief.