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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 23: the War in Missouri.-doings of the Confederate Congress. --Affairs in Baltimore.--Piracies. (search)
had quickly subsided after he was called away; and under the mild administration of martial law by General Cadwalader, his successor, they became daily more bold and defiant, and gave much uneasiness to the Government. It was known that the majority of the members of the Maryland Legislature were disloyal, and that secretly and openly they were doing all they could to array their State against the National Government. A committee of that body The Committee consisted of Messrs. McKaig, Yellott, and Harding. had addressed a sympathizing epistle to Jefferson Davis, in which he was unwarrantably assured that the people of Maryland coincided with the conspirators in sentiment; for at the elections for members of Congress, June 13, 1861. to represent the State in the extraordinary session to begin on the 4th of July, so loyal was the great mass of the people of that State, that not a single sympathizer with secession was chosen. In the city of Baltimore was the head of the secessi
government of the United States, tending to a peaceful solution of the present difficulties, the recent attempts of this government to enter into negotiations with that of the United States were attended with results which forbid any renewal of proposals from it to that government. If any further assurance of the desire of this government for peace were necessary, it would be sufficient to observe that being formed of a confederation of sovereign States, each acting and deciding for itself, the right of every other sovereign State to assume self action and self government is necessarily acknowledged. Hence conquests of other States are wholly inconsistent with the fundamental principles and subversive of the very organization of this government. Its policy cannot but be peace — peace with all nations and people. Very respectfully, Jefferson Datis. To Messrs. McKaig, Yellott, and Harding, committee of the Maryland Legislature. --Rochester (N. Y.) Daily Union, June 14.
Maryland. --In the Maryland Senate on Wednesday, the resolution to appoint committees to visit Presidents Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, and the Governors of Virginia and Pennsylvania, were filled by electing Messrs. Brooke, Yellott, McKaig and Lynch as the committee on the part of the Senate, and ordered to a third reading.
ent would readily entertain any proposition from the Government of the United States tending to a peaceful solution of the pending difficulties the recent attempts of this Government to enter into negotiations with that of the United States were attended with results which forbid any renewal of proposals from it to that Government. If any further assurance of the desire of this Government for peace were necessary, it would be sufficient to observe that, being formed of a confederation of sovereign States, each acting and deciding for itself, the right of every other sovereign State to the same self-action and self-government is necessarily acknowledged. Hence conquests of other States are wholly inconsistent with the fundamental principles, and subversive of the very origination of this Government. Its policy cannot but be peace — peace with all nations and people. Very respectfully, Jeff. Davis. Messrs. McLaig, Yellott and Harding, Committee of Maryland Legislature.
Man Yellott; Esq. --This well-known ander, whose zeal in the cause of the has reflected credit upon the old Whig party of his State, he having been one of the first men in Baltimore to denounce publicly the Back Republican proclivities of the Patriot, which under the pretence of going with Mr. for Bell, was giving "aid and comfort" to Lincoln, and having since steadily adhered to Southern principles through evil and good report appeared in our paper of yesterday morning disguised as Tellott. Though the stake was merely a typographical one, our regard for this high-toned gentleman induces thus to correct it.