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December 12. The Montgomery (Ala.) Mail, of this day, says that there have been six alarms of fire in that city within the two previous days. The Commercial Hall was fired twice in broad daylight. There was much excitement and great exasperation among the citizens. In the Maryland Legislature, in session at Annapolis, a resolution was introduced declaring the seat of Hon. Coleman Yellott, Senator from Baltimore, vacant, on the ground that during three successive sessions of the body he absented himself from his seat therein, without assigning any reason therefor; and whereas, it is a matter of public notoriety, established also by testimony before the Committee on Judicial Proceedings, that the said Senator from Baltimore City has gone to Virginia, and has no intention of resuming his seat in the Senate; and whereas, it is right and proper, in these times of public peril, the large and populous city of Baltimore should be represented here; and whereas, the Constitution of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line. (search)
he Association in such manner as will best promote its objects. art. XIII. This Constitution may be amended at any regular monthly meeting of the Association, provided two-thirds of all the members then present assent to such amendment. I find among my Confederate papers, and in Major Frank A. Bond's handwriting, the following list of the officers elected on the 8th of June, 1861; all of whom, if my memory serves me correctly, were present at the organization of the Association. Coleman Yellott, President. Dr. Charles A. Harding, Vice President. B. S. White, R. H. Archer, T. Sturgis Davis, Frank A. Bond, Geo. R. Garther, Jr., James A. Kemer, Council. Horace E. Hayden, Secretary. B. S. White, Treasurer. The Association failed. Why I know not; and the Howard county troops, known as the Maryland cavalry, June 15, 1861, left Leesburg to join the command of Colonel Angus McDonald at Romney. This company subsequently became the basis of the first battalion of Maryland
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
t worth the room it would take to record them. The time for protests was past, if it ever had existed, and as the scolding of the Maryland legislature became annoying to the authorities, they determined to suppress the one and thus silence the other. On September 12, 1861, Major-General Dix, commanding in Baltimore, ordered the arrest of the members of the legislature from Baltimore City and the mayor and other obnoxious persons who annoyed him with talk, to-wit: George William Brown, Coleman Yellott, Senator Stephen P. Dennis, Charles H. Pitts, Andrew A. Lynch, Lawrence Langston, H M. Morfit, Ross Winans, J. Hanson Thomas, W. G. Harrison, John C. Brune, Robert M. Denison, Leonard D. Quinlan, Thomas W. Renshaw, Henry May, member of Congress from the Fourth congressional district, Frank Key Howard, editor of the Baltimore Exchange, and Thomas W. Hall, editor of the South. The arrests were made with great secrecy, and it was intended to send them to the Dry Tortugas, but there being
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
o companies at the Point of Rocks were mustered into the Army of the Confederate States, by Lieutenant-Colonel George Deas, as Companies A and B, of the First Maryland regiment. Six other companies were mustered into the same service and regiment on the 22nd at Harper's Ferry. They were afterward consolidated into four companies. Other Marylanders congregated at Leesburg, and on June 6th, 1861, held a meeting, at which five counties and the City of Baltimore were represented, of which Coleman Yellott was President, and Frank A. Bond, Secretary. They formed an association, calling themselves The Independent Association of the Maryland Line, and adopted a constitution which provided for organizing the members into companies, regiments and brigades. Nothing further ever came of this movement. The companies of Dorsey, Murray and Robertson were, late in May and early in June, mustered into the Virginia service at Richmond, and then transferred to the First Maryland regiment, which t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line in the Confederate Army. (search)
o companies at the Point of Rocks were mustered into the Army of the Confederate States, by Lieutenant-Colonel George Deas, as Companies A and B, of the First Maryland regiment. Six other companies were mustered into the same service and regiment on the 22nd at Harper's Ferry. They were afterward consolidated into four companies. Other Marylanders congregated at Leesburg, and on June 6th, 1861, held a meeting, at which five counties and the City of Baltimore were represented, of which Coleman Yellott was President, and Frank A. Bond, Secretary. They formed an association, calling themselves The Independent Association of the Maryland Line, and adopted a constitution which provided for organizing the members into companies, regiments and brigades. Nothing further ever came of this movement. The companies of Dorsey, Murray and Robertson were, late in May and early in June, mustered into the Virginia service at Richmond, and then transferred to the First Maryland regiment, which t
Messrs. Thos. J. McKay and Coleman Yellott, two of the Maryland Commissioners, arrived in this city yesterday, and are stopping at the Exchange Hotel.
ng the Legislature, and the ordering of an election in Baltimore immediately after the 19th of April riots for members of the Legislature. He determined that the conspirators there, and those acting with them in Virginia, should be frustrated, as far as possible. He therefore subsequently called a meeting of the Legislature, but not at Baltimore. When the Legislature met at Frederick, Mr. Mason, of Virginia, was there; but he soon found it was best to leave. He mentioned the name of Coleman Yellott (a State Senator) as among those most active in attempting to force revolution at that time, and who subsequently went into Virginia and remained there. Threats had previously been made against him, (Mr. Hicks) and ropes carried to hang him and revolvers to shoot him. Mr. Hicks said he was for supporting the Government in all proper measures to put down the rebellion. He had voted to indemnify the President and authorize him to suspend the writ of habeas corpus. Arrests had been
The Daily Dispatch: October 19, 1863., [Electronic resource], Secret history of the subjugation of Maryland. (search)
wing bad cases: R. M. Denison, 4; J. W. Dennis, 4; John B. Brown, 4; G. W. Goldsborough, 4; Barnes Compton, 3; H. M. Warfield, 3; T. Parkin Scott, 3; S. Teackle Wallis, 3; W. H. Legg, 3; G. Kilborn, 3. In the Senate — Franklin Whittaker, 4; Coleman Yellott, 4; Thos. J. McKaig, 3; Teagle Townshend, 3. Suggestions of arrest — the Altered Complexion of the Legislature. I suggest the arrest of the following members, I. A. D.: Senate — Anne Arundel, Thomas Franklin; Cecil, John J. Hecles F. Goldsborough; Harford, Franklin Whittaker; Howard, John S. Watkins; Kent, David C. Blackston; Prince George's, John B. Brooke; St. Mary's, Oscar Miles. McKaig, of Alleghany, and Lynch, of Baltimore county, are already in custody, and Yellott, of Baltimore city, is in Richmond Teagle Townshend, of Worcester, should not be arrested. Great rascal. House — Alleghany, Josiah H. Gordon and William B. Bernard; Anne Arundel, B. Allen Welch, McCubbin, E. G. Kilbourn, Calvert, James T.