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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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rn Virginia. General Taylor was assigned as its commander by this order, but Col. Leroy A. Stafford, of the Ninth, was mainly in command until, in October, 1862, his regiment was transferred to the First brigade. The command of the First brigade, composed after July 26th of the Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, and Fourteenth Louisiana regiments, was given to Harry T. Hays, promoted to brigadier-general. Hays' successor in command of the Pelican regiment was Lieut.-Col. Davidson B. Penn. Col. Zeb York was in command of the Fourteenth, with David Zable as lieutenant-colonel. To the Third battalion, to fill out the Fifteenth regiment, was soon added two companies, the Orleans Blues and Cathoula Guerrillas, of the St. Paul Foot Rifles, which during the Seven Days had been consolidated with the battalion of Lieut.-Col. G. Coppens. Lieutenant Colonel Nicholls, of the Eighth, was promoted to colonel of the new Fifteenth, and held that rank until October 14th, 1862, when he became brigadier
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Distinguished dead [from the New Orleans Picayune, April 10, 1898.1 (search)
heroes, the great soldiers, Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, and our own Louisiana leaders, Generals Beauregard, Harry T. Hayes, Francis T. Nicholls, Dick Taylor, William E. Starke, Eugene Waggaman, Davidson B. Penn, Leroy Stafford, Zeb York, and others, too, all Louisianians, directly in command of the Louisiana troops in Virginia. I speak more particularly now of the infantry of that army, but to those named should be added such splendid soldiers as Colonel J. B. Walton, the fiding his battery at Fredericksburg, and the latter also killed while in command at the second Winchester. These and others, many others, the names of whom I cannot now recall, have already joined the silent majority, excepting only four-Nicholls, York, Penn and Eshleman. Mr. President, I will not attempt to speak of the record and the glories of that wonderful army, the Army of Northern Virginia. That record is made up, and is part of the history and the glory of the Confederates States, gi
A Pipe for Lincolnites to Smoke. --The Concordia Rifles who have arrived here, says the New Orleans Delta, are commanded by Zeb York, a man who, it is said, is able to buy the Washington Administration. Capt. York and Mr. Hoover, of Concordia, raised the company at their own expense. They pay their men $15 a month, give $20 a month to the support of each man's wife in necessitous circumstances, and $5 to each soldier's child. If any individual or corporation can beat this, we would likeincolnites to Smoke. --The Concordia Rifles who have arrived here, says the New Orleans Delta, are commanded by Zeb York, a man who, it is said, is able to buy the Washington Administration. Capt. York and Mr. Hoover, of Concordia, raised the company at their own expense. They pay their men $15 a month, give $20 a month to the support of each man's wife in necessitous circumstances, and $5 to each soldier's child. If any individual or corporation can beat this, we would like to know it.