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ns gave the enemy possession of the pontoon-bridge, and thus cut off General Hoke's brigade from any escape, except by swimming. Our extreme right being thrown back, the brave Colonel Godwin, although surrounded on all sides, except on the river-side, still fought on, and when compelled to yield ground to overwhelming odds, fell back with a force of about seventy-five men, still returning the enemy's fire, and refused to surrender until fighting was useless. Lieutenant-Colonel Tate and Major York, Captains McPherson and Ray, and Lieutenant Mebane, of the Sixth, with Captain Adams, of the staff, broke away, and escaped over the bridge in the darkness. Lieutenants Williams, Smith, and Fitzgerald, of the Fifty-fourth; Brown, of the Sixth, with a few others, plunged into the river and swam safely over; but, unfortunately, some others were drowned. Lieutenant-Colonel H. Jones, Jr., of the Fifty-seventh, and Captain White, of the Sixth, plunged in to swim, but the coldness of the water
nd in every other way, will not probably exceed one hundred and fifty men, and after three days rest, the horses and men will be ready for duty again wherever their services may be needed. Fortress Monroe, Va., Saturday, March 5, 1864. By referring to the foregoing account, and taking a look at the map, it will be seen that our forces traversed nine different counties now occupied by the enemy, namely, Spottsylvania, Caroline, Hanover, Goochland, Henrico, Louisa, New-Kent, James City, and York. These counties embrace nearly all of the most aristocratic in the State; peopled before the war mainly by families who boasted of their long line of ancestors, the number of their negroes, their broad acres — in fact, where the feudal lords reigned supreme both over the white trash and the negro in bondage. The condition of this section of the country, which has been under almost uninterrupted rebel sway for three years cannot be otherwise than interesting. In riding through these countie
ing only a slight flesh-wound upon his abdomen. The watch thus providentially saved his life. Dr. York, surgeon of the Fifty-fourth Illinois, while passing through the Court-House, was approached bye pistol being held so close to him that the powder burned his coat! So far as we could learn, Dr. York was not actively engaged in the affray, save in his professional capacity as surgeon, and in trion, cutting the telegraph wire as they went — unfortunately before a despatch could be sent to Dr. York's family, at Paris, giving notice of his assassination. About five o'clock the reinforcementn oath of allegiance, taken by him at Paris, recently. He boasted that he was the man who shot Dr. York; that he came for that purpose. We herewith present the following list of killed and wounded: Killed.--Major York, Surgeon Fifty-fourth Illinois; Alfred Swim, company C, Fifty-fourth; Nelson Wells, copperhead; John Cooper, copperhead. Wounded.--Colonel Mitchell, Fifty-fourth Illinois,