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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Victor A. Yorke or search for Victor A. Yorke in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
ediately detected, and read with much gravity. The last I saw of him he climbed on his big white horse and remarked with a wink: As soon as I get there, I shall bring on a general action, right off. It was here that I had quite a surprise. Looking through my glass at General Webb's division, I detected two civilians, in English-looking clothes, riding with the Staff. As they approached, it seemed to me that the face of one was familiar; and as they rode up, behold, to be sure, the Hon. Mr. Yorke, who was our fellow passenger and played on the fiddle and admired the baby! He was in the Royal Artillery, you know, and had come down to see what he could. And there he was, much covered with dust, but cheerful and pleasant to the last. It was a fine sight to see the great, black columns of infantry, moving steadily along, their muskets glittering in the sun (for the day was quite perfect as to clearness), and then the batteries on the flank, and, in the rear, the train of ambulance
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
omfortable. At any rate he looked bored, and his only military remark did not indicate deep reflection. This, said I, is what we call a corduroy road. Oh! ah! Indeed; yes, well, it's very well now, you know, but what will you do when it comes wet weather? I was too much overcome at this putting the cart before the horse, to inform him that the corduroy was built for no other purpose than for wet weather. After this I confined myself to considerations of the state of health of the Hon. Mr. Yorke (he who came back with us from Liverpool). He is under the command of the Colonel, it would appear, and afforded an innocent topic of conversation. Since then two other English officers have been entrusted to the fatherly care of Rosencrantz, and diligently shown round. When they got near the end, they said: Now we are much pleased to find you are a foreigner, because we can frankly ask you, what you consider the general feeling towards the English in this country. To which Rosie (who d
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
battle of, 98. Wilkinson, Morton Smith, 75. Willcox, Orlando Bolivar, 212, 234, 310. Williams, Seth, 23, 60, 110, 123, 171, 221, 258, 270; on Sunday work, 28; brevet denied, 289; messenger to Lee, 354. Williams house, 173, 189. Wilson, James Harrison, 82, 104, 136, 156. Wingate, —, 357. Winthrop, Frederick, 800. Wise, Henry Alexander, 162, 361. Women in camp, 64, 65, 74, 75, 314, 317, 318; dinner party, 71; ultra-secessionist, 119; poor, 129. Woodruff, George, 315. Woodruff, Henry Dwight, 287. Woody's house, 140. Woolsey, Charles W., 253, 294. Wooten, Thomas J., 152, 187. Worth, William Scott, 64, 210, 318. Wounded, spirit of the, 71, 128. Wright, Horatio Gouverneur, 88, 90, 98, 108, 110, 111, 112, 114, 128, 135, 137, 138, 140, 143, 145, 148, 179, 190, 314, 350, 352; on Mott's men, 110n; before Petersburg, 173, 184, 334, 337; poor luck, 800. Wyatt's house, 301. Yorke, Victor A., 42, 267. Young, —, Dr., 26. Zacksnifska [Zakrzewska, Marie Elizabeth],